The ScienceBlogs Book Club

Erin Johnson

In addition to author Mark Pendergrast, we have four more outstanding contributors here to discuss Inside the Outbreaks over the next few weeks. Though they all come from public health backgrounds, their experiences in and with the Epidemic Intelligence Service are all different. Check out their bios below and tune in to see what they…

Before writing Inside the Outbreaks: The Elite Medical Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service, Atlanta native Mark Pendergrast authored a history of another of the city’s cornerstone institutions, the Coca-Cola company, in addition to a history of coffee and two other books. Pendergrast graduated from Harvard with a degree in English literature before receiving his…

What’s that rumbling sound?

Is it distant thunder? A passing freight train? World Cup fans celebrating a goal? Nope…that’s the sound of the ScienceBlogs Book Club becoming active again! It’s been awhile since we hosted a Book Club discussion here on the blog – not since Paul Offitt’s Autism’s False Prophets back in 2008 – but we thought it…

This book review was originally posted by GrrlScientist on Living the Scientific Life. tags: book review, Sleeping Naked is Green, green living, environment, Vanessa Farquharson Carbon footprints, global warming, green living — are these phrases an inconvenient truth that keep you awake at night, wondering how you can live in a more environmentally friendly way?…

This book review was originally posted by Greg Laden on Greg Laden’s Blog. previously reviewed Birds: Nature’s Magnificent Flying Machines is a book by Caroline Arnold and illustrated by Patricia Wynne for, I’d say, Pre-Elementary School kids and first/second grade. This is a good book to read to a pre-literate kid. Then put it away…

This book review was originally posted by GrrlScientist on Living the Scientific Life. tags: book review, Unholy Business, religious antiquities, biblical antiquities, fraud, Christianity, Judaism, Nina Burleigh There are two different types of people in the world, those who want to know, and those who want to believe. – Friedrich Nietzsche In November 2002, an…

This review was originally posted by Brian Switek on Laelaps Since the early 20th century, at least, young earth creationists have attempted to blame Charles Darwin for genocide, world wars, and whatever political movements seemed most threatening at one time or another (i.e. communism). What Darwin is faulted with changes with the times, but most…

For more video book reviews by Joanne Manaster, see her page on YouTube.

This review was originally posted by Steinn Sigurðsson on Dynamics of Cats. As I was strolling through town a few weeks ago, I saw a flyer advertising a talk on campus by Prof. Barbara Oakley, talking about her book “Evil Genes: Why Rome Fell, Hitler Rose, Enron Failed and My Sister Stole My Mother’s Boyfriend.”…

Originally published on Pharyngula When I was growing up, I had no introduction to evolutionary theory. Sure, I assumed it was true, and I went through the usual long phase of dinosaur fandom, but I was never taught anything at all about evolution throughout my grade school education, and what little I did know was…