The Book of Trogool

Archives for January, 2010

I had the following exchange several times during the opening day of Science Online 2010: Interlocutor: “So what do you do?” Me: “I’m a librarian.” Interlocutor: *lengthy pause* So? what are you doing here exactly? Er, what? A conference about science communication? How on earth can that not be imagined to intrigue a librarian? This,…

Adding a category

I’m still at Science Online 2010 and will have observations on it later, but first I’d like to acknowledge and celebrate a resource that has been absolutely crucial to my professional career?and indeed, to my profession. Open Access News, under the able direction of Peter Suber and Gavin Baker, has for years been the single…

Science Online 2010

Blogging is liable to be sparse next week, as I will be at Science Online 2010 to do a workshop about institutional repositories, and talk about libraries generally alongside the inestimable Stephanie Willen Brown. Here are the slides for my half of the latter: So you think you know libraries I’m not doing slides for…

Either/or?

Chris Rusbridge retweeted my tweet last night announcing my previous post. His prefatory comment gave me pause: “Curation by researcher or librarian?” Er, both? Plus IT? I’ve never thought anything different, and if I’ve given the impression that I want to grab the entire pie for librarianship, I hereby apologize profusely. Acknowledging right now that…

If you’re not reading the comments here, you’re missing the best part of the blog. Case in point, this comment from the incomparable Chris Rusbridge, which I reproduce as a post so that those who are missing the best part of the blog don’t miss it: Several things I wanted to respond to. You say…

Scholarly legitimacy

I had the honor to participate in a futurist exercise by ALA’s Association for Library Collections and Technical Services. The short essays they solicited have been placed online; they are well worth perusal. I wish the discussants at ALA’s Midwinter gathering a pleasant and stimulating exchange. With ALCTS’s permission, I include my own entry here…

Magical thinking in data curation

Peter Keane has a lengthy and worthwhile piece about the need for a “killer app” in data management. It’s too meaty to relegate to a tidbits post; go read it and see what you think, then come back. My reaction to the piece is complex, and I’m still rereading it to work through my own…