Open Access

The Book of Trogool

Category archives for Open Access

I would be utterly remiss in my duties were I not to point out SciBling John Wilbanks’s vitally important new open-access initiative. I pledge my full and free support. After all, my brain is basically purée anyway? (Apologies to those who saw this briefly yesterday. John jumped the, er, gun yesterday, and so did I.)

Much is murky in open access, but this at least is clear: academic libraries have committed different amounts of money and staff toward an open-access future, from a flat zero up to hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth. It’s the zeroes and near-zeroes that concern me (why, hello there, Yale, and hello again, Yale), though…

It’s Friday

Having inflicted at least one truly Bulwer-Lytton-contest-worthy metaphor on FriendFeed today (“The NPG/CDL thing isn’t about open access; open access is just lurking there, kinda like a knife-wielding maniac in a horror movie”), I feel I must raise the stakes by linking to this Derangement and Description comic. This is the first time anyone has…

Gauntlet volleying

This morning, when Nature Publishing Group responded to the University of California library’s broadside, I contemplated taking the response apart piece by piece in a bit of “… translated into English” satire. I’m glad I didn’t have the chance. I’m much, much happier for people to read the University of California library’s response. (By the…

This is the sort of event I can never, ever manage to predict. Like the Harvard OA mandate. Or the PRISM Coalition. In brief, Nature Publishing Group tried the usual big-publisher contract-renewal tactics: jack the price a lot, because although librarians squeal, faculty never listen, so eventually the librarians knuckle under and sign the big…

Journal publishing’s future

I’m not a business analyst with my eye on the scholarly publishing industry, but if I were, I’d sound an awful lot like Claudio Aspesi being interviewed by Richard Poynder. I can’t speak to Elsevier’s internal organizational issues, but the rest of Aspesi’s words ring true to me. Libraries have kicked the serials can as…

I hacked the academy

This post is intended for Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt’s crowdsourced Hacking the Academy book. Arguments about open access usually appeal to altruism, tradition, or economics. Even arguments supposedly aimed at researcher self-interest strike me as curiously abstract, devoid of useful example. I will therefore tell my story about open access, because I hacked the…

Conflagration coming

I’m on record predicting a toll-access journal bloodbath. Anecdotes are not data, one dead swallow doesn’t mean the end of summer, and so on? but I just heard yesterday about a second small independent toll-access journal whose sponsors may be discussing winding it down. This isn’t the scenario I was quite looking for; I expected…

No more can-kicking

Having made it back at last from Scotland despite the ash cloud, and overcome jetlag and (some) to-do list explosion, I finally have leisure to reflect a bit on UKSG 2010. My dominant takeaway is that nearly everyone in the scholarly-publishing ecosystem?publishers and librarians alike?is finally aware that we can’t keep kicking the journal-cost can…

Hiatus continues, and an onion

My husband and I have been stranded by the ash cloud from Iceland. We are well-housed thanks to good friends and the strength of weak ties, so there is no need to worry about us. With luck, we’ll be able to get home Tuesday the 27th. Blogging will continue to be sporadic until we’re home.…