Tactics

The Book of Trogool

Category archives for Tactics

The basic carrot: usage statistics

BMC Bioinformatics published this article describing a “data publishing framework” for biodiversity data. Stripped to its essentials, this article is about carrots for data sharing. Acknowledging that cultural inertia (some of it well-founded) militates against spontaneous data sharing, the authors suggest a way forward. I’m calling this one out because it has implications for storage-system…

Libraries do collaborative collection development, through consortia and increasingly via direct institution-to-institution arrangements. Reference and instruction are collaborative endeavors?look at any social-networking service with lots of librarians and you’ll see on-the-spot crowdsourced reference responses. Perhaps this collaboration instinct will help libraries respond to the challenge of domain expertise for data curation. Do I need to…

No, you can’t have a pony

I read the RIN report on life-sciences data with interest, a little cynicism, and much appreciation for the grounded and sensible approach I have come to expect from British reports. If you’re interested in data services, you should read this report too. A warning to avoid preconceptions: If you pay too much attention to all…

I pointed out Mike Lesk’s slideshow in my last tidbits post, finding it a good critical précis of the data problem. It’s pleasantly aware of human problems, human problems many treatments of cyberinfrastructure (including, unfortunately, this otherwise useful call to action from Educause) wholly ignore. So wince and flinch at the design (black Arial on…

Graft or hybridize?

I’ve lived all my short career in academic libraries thus far on the new-service frontier. In so doing, I’ve looked around and learned a bit about how academic libraries, research libraries in particular, tend to manage new services. With apologies to all the botanists I am about to offend by massacring their specialty, here is…

I’m still buried in translating a presentation into Spanish for Monday and finishing another in English for Wednesday, but here’s a small thought to tide folks over, a thought that came to me shortly before my presentation at Access. At the data-curation workshops I’ve been to, it has been axiomatic that “we can’t afford to…

Set your house in order

Roy Tennant sent me an email about my Access presentation in which he asked what libraries should do about the laundry-list of data-curation challenges I presented. (If you’re curious, you can go view the presentation yourself, courtesy of the wonderful A/V folk at Access. The less-than-an-hour-long way to assimilate the same information is to look…

In many of the data-curation talks and discussions I’ve attended, a distinction has been drawn between Big Science and small science, the latter sometimes being lumped with humanities research. I’m not sure this distinction completely holds up in practice?are the quantitative social sciences Big or small? what about medicine??but there’s definitely food for thought there.…

I commented here earlier, not without frustration, about a pair of researchers who built and abandoned a disciplinary repository. I was particularly annoyed that they seemed to have done this purely for self-aggrandizement, apparently feeling no particular attachment to the resulting repository. Such as they should not open repositories. Neither they nor any service they…

ETDs as the data-curation wedge?

Many doctoral institutions now accept and archive (or are planning to accept and archive) theses and dissertations electronically. Virginia Tech pioneered this quite some time ago, and it has caught on slowly but steadily for reasons of cost, convenience, access, and necessity. Necessity? Afraid so. Some theses and dissertations are honest digital artifacts, unable to…