Justin Eure

of Brookhaven National Lab

Justin is a science writer for the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Lab, grateful for the opportunity to grapple daily with concepts far beyond his expertise. He works with some of the world's leading scientists to tell stories about their innovative explorations into itty-bitty quarks, super massive black holes, and everything in between.

Mantis shrimp, or stomatopods, are the planet’s most powerful bare-knuckle boxers, armed with dactyl clubs that literally fly faster than a speeding .22 caliber bullet. Each strike boils the surrounding water and creates a tiny cavitation bubble, which then implodes with a sonic pop that can render targets unconscious. Consider that: if the strike itself doesn’t get you,…

With nanotechnology rapidly advancing, the sci-fi dream of a Star Trek replicator becomes increasingly less fantastic. But such radical technology would, in theory, require the kind of subatomic manipulation that far exceeds current capabilities. Scientists lack both the equipment and the fundamental knowledge of quantum mechanics (the Standard Model, for all its elegance, remains incomplete)…

Let’s start with a number, by chance a palindrome: 1441. Imagine taking that many photographs of a single object, a soccer ball, say – obsessively capturing it from every angle to expose all the details. Those 1441 images provide all the evidence needed to illustrate and understand the three dimensional structure of that soccer ball.…

Imagine looking in the mirror and finding your familiar face reflected back as you’ve always known it. But as you look more closely, as you precisely examine that mirror image, subtle distortions emerge. The glass itself remains flawless, but real and fundamental differences exist between you and the face that lives on the other side…

No one credits heavy drinking with making people smarter – the mind-numbing effects are well documented. Odds are that if you haven’t experienced this personally, you’ve witnessed it in the foolish antics of others. The clear correlation between rapidly diminishing intelligence and rising alcohol consumption is no secret. But the long-term effects may go deeper…