Kendra Snyder

Neutrinos Disappearing at Daya Bay?

This guest post is by Brookhaven Lab physicist Steve Kettell, the Chief Scientist for the U.S. Daya Bay Neutrino Project in southern China. Kettell received his Ph.D. in 1990 from Yale University and is the leader of Brookhaven’s Electronic Detector Group. Steve Kettell Neutrinos are downright weird! Produced in prodigious numbers in the sun, supernovae,…

At first glance, this video might look like it’s playing in reverse. But don’t worry, these stroboscopic images were patched together in the right order. Courtesy of Labcyte, Inc. The video shows a technique called acoustic drop ejection (ADE) – an idea based on sending ultrasonic waves near the surface of a liquid to eject…

Hair breaks. It singes. It falls out. It might not be the strongest feature of living human bodies, but hair is one of the best-preserved tissues of dead ones, providing a record of diet, age, metabolism, and, sometimes, even the cause of death. Ferdinand II* With intense beams of x-rays at Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light…

This guest post is written by Stephen R. Springston, an atmospheric chemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. After receiving his Ph.D. in chemistry from Indiana University, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Utah before joining Brookhaven in 1986. Stephen Springston After studying clouds and climate in Oklahoma during tornado season and storms atop…

Solar Farm, East-Coast Style

Brookhaven will soon be home to the largest solar farm in the eastern United States. The Long Island Solar Farm, being constructed by BP Solar and the Long Island Power Authority on Brookhaven Lab’s campus, will produce 32 megawatts of power when complete – enough to power about 4,500 homes. The Long Island Solar Farm…

In news that may shake the cranberry juice industry to its core, new atomic-level “snapshots” reveal how bacteria such as E. coli produce and secrete sticky appendages called pili, which help the microbes attach to and infect human bladder cells. These crystal structures — produced at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven Lab…

NSLS-II Digs Up History

Five years before becoming fully operational, Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) already is leading to discoveries — of the historical kind. Pieces of newspaper dug up at the NSLS-II construction site, which include a story about a boxing match scheduled for October 2, 1917 – Tommy Tuohey versus Ed Wallace As earthwork takes…

One moment *way* back in time

What did the universe look like 11 billion years ago? Something like this: This image is part of the largest-ever 3-D map of the distant universe, which was released yesterday by scientists from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) at the April meeting of the American Physical Society. Just a slice of the entire…

Whoooah, we’re halfway there…

Construction on Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) — which will allow scientists to explore everything from fuel cell catalysts and soil samples to molecules vital for human life — has passed the 50-percent completion mark.

Pop Goes the Photomultiplier Tube

How do scientists make glass stronger? Break it. Brookhaven Lab physicists and engineers take this hands-on approach a step further. In order to strengthen the design of glass bulbs known as photomultiplier tubes, the researchers submerge the devices in 500,000 gallons of pressurized water, punch a small hole through their sides, and watch as the…