Brookhaven National Laboratory

Tag archives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

Muons on the Move

Big science is a massively collaborative endeavor. From the initial theoretical puzzles to the brilliant engineers that build on-of-a-kind machinery, experts come together to make discoveries happen. Case in point: We’re  moving this 50-foot-wide physics experiment over 3,200 miles of land, sea, and river, starting on Long Island, NY and ending in Batavia, IL. Sometimes understanding…

Magnets are neverendingly awesome, and superconductors may be the ultimate in cool—they are, after all, literally extremely cold. And not just anyone has the tools to weave superconducting magnets with compressed metallic thread. It’s a more essential skill than you might think. Ultra-cold superconducting magnets steer high-speed particles inside colliders, keeping the beams tight and…

We sat down with Brookhaven theoretical physicist Raju Venugopalan for a conversation about “color glass condensate” and the structure of visible matter in the universe. Q. We’ve heard a lot recently about a “new form of matter” possibly seen at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe — a state of saturated gluons called “color…

See the way those smooth, amorphous blobs rapidly transform into textured honeycombs? Something similar is probably happening right now inside your laptop or smartphone’s battery, providing you with portable power. But the cherished efficiency and portability of those compact lithium-ion batteries comes with a cost: each cycle of discharge/recharge degrades the material’s essential structure and…

High-temperature superconductors (HTS), capable of storing and transmitting electricity with perfect efficiency, are a theoretical stumbling block. The mechanism underlying HTS behavior is a mystery, and the subject of significant contention and investigation among scientists. This puzzle, unlike headline-making unknowns such as dark energy (admittedly awesome and worth losing sleep over), could revolutionize our entire…

At first glance, this video might look like it’s playing in reverse. But don’t worry, these stroboscopic images were patched together in the right order. Courtesy of Labcyte, Inc. The video shows a technique called acoustic drop ejection (ADE) – an idea based on sending ultrasonic waves near the surface of a liquid to eject…

This guest post is written by Stephen R. Springston, an atmospheric chemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. After receiving his Ph.D. in chemistry from Indiana University, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Utah before joining Brookhaven in 1986. Stephen Springston After studying clouds and climate in Oklahoma during tornado season and storms atop…

Solar Farm, East-Coast Style

Brookhaven will soon be home to the largest solar farm in the eastern United States. The Long Island Solar Farm, being constructed by BP Solar and the Long Island Power Authority on Brookhaven Lab’s campus, will produce 32 megawatts of power when complete – enough to power about 4,500 homes. The Long Island Solar Farm…

In news that may shake the cranberry juice industry to its core, new atomic-level “snapshots” reveal how bacteria such as E. coli produce and secrete sticky appendages called pili, which help the microbes attach to and infect human bladder cells. These crystal structures — produced at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven Lab…

NSLS-II Digs Up History

Five years before becoming fully operational, Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) already is leading to discoveries — of the historical kind. Pieces of newspaper dug up at the NSLS-II construction site, which include a story about a boxing match scheduled for October 2, 1917 – Tommy Tuohey versus Ed Wallace As earthwork takes…