NSLS

Tag archives for NSLS

Mantis shrimp, or stomatopods, are the planet’s most powerful bare-knuckle boxers, armed with dactyl clubs that literally fly faster than a speeding .22 caliber bullet. Each strike boils the surrounding water and creates a tiny cavitation bubble, which then implodes with a sonic pop that can render targets unconscious. Consider that: if the strike itself doesn’t get you,…

This guest post was written by Mona S. Rowe, science writer for Brookhaven National Laboratory’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and NSLS-II. The quest to authenticate an unknown Rembrandt painting, titled “Old Man with a Beard,” hit a dramatic high at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an advanced x-ray…

Jason Graetz, left, and Jiajun Chen at NSLS beamline X14A with their transparent reactor for viewing chemistry in real time. Here’s a recipe for basic chemistry: Mix a bunch of stuff in a reaction vessel and see what happens. Only you don’t really see the action taking place — unless you have some way to…

Hair breaks. It singes. It falls out. It might not be the strongest feature of living human bodies, but hair is one of the best-preserved tissues of dead ones, providing a record of diet, age, metabolism, and, sometimes, even the cause of death. Ferdinand II* With intense beams of x-rays at Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light…

In news that may shake the cranberry juice industry to its core, new atomic-level “snapshots” reveal how bacteria such as E. coli produce and secrete sticky appendages called pili, which help the microbes attach to and infect human bladder cells. These crystal structures — produced at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven Lab…

A little more than one year ago, on the day of its groundbreaking ceremony, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) construction site was nothing more than a whole lot of dirt. Today, it’s…well, take a look for yourself.