Dr. Joan Bushwell's Chimpanzee Refuge

Thanks to commenter Derelict from my Summer Reading entry, I listened to a talk with Christopher Hitchens on the Dennis Prager show. There was one particular item that caught my ear. Prager posed the following question:

“If you were in a strange city in the USA at night and you saw ten men coming toward you, would you or would you not be relieved to know that they had just come from a bible study class?”


Apparently, Hitchens mentioned this question in his book God Is Not Great, but generalized it to “religious study” and any city in the world. Hitchens then recounted a number of instances where he’d definitely feel less secure with this knowledge, for example, in Beirut or Baghdad, but Prager countered that he specifically meant the USA and bible study. This got me to thinking how I would react.

Quite simply, I would be relieved, but not for the reasons that Prager implies.

My guess is that Prager is implying that there is something about bible study per se (or perhaps by extension, the men being Christian) that makes the stranger feel better in this situation. Therefore, being Christian (or studying the bible) is a good thing. I think this is way off of the mark. In fact, the scenario really ties into fear of the unknown. Consider the two options:

1) Ten men of unknown origin,
2) Ten men coming from bible study.

In the former case, these men could be coming from anywhere. They could be a bunch of ruffians just out of a bar or gang members prowling their turf. In this instance, the mind has a tendency to run to the extreme, the worst case, in order to operate cautiously. After all, you are in a strange city at night. You are vulnerable. Consequently, knowing something about the men (i.e., that they’re coming from bible study) may remove some of these extreme possibilities and therefore reduce the tension.

The important thing is that the same effect can be achieved with a variety of other schemes. For example, in the same situation, would you be relieved to know that the ten men had just come from a night out on the town after attending an ice cream sales convention earlier that afternoon? I certainly would. By all means, attack me with a few pints of mint chocolate chip. Fling a maraschino cherry at me. And don’t skimp on the chocolate sauce, ’cause you know I’ve been a very naughty boy. Or consider this variation: Would you feel less at ease if the ten men were young, with disheveled clothing, and hadn’t shaved for at least a day? What if those same ten men turned out to be young computer programmers who had just gotten out of a movie marathon featuring the entire Star Wars series from start to finish? Not quite so scary, is it?

Now consider a comparison: Would you rather that the ten men have come from bible study or that they’re a bunch sci-fi loving programmer-types? I don’t know about you, but I’d take the programmers because at least then I’d know that they won’t verbally accost me and try to sell me “the good news in the good book”.

Of course, in either case I’d be looking over my shoulder for those ice cream salesmen.

Comments

  1. #1 Gork
    June 1, 2007

    I used to drive cab in Barstow, California. Every single one of the minors who tried cheating me out of a fare I either picked up or dropped off at the christian school. They were skilled liars, astonishingly good for being that young.

    Ten bible crazies coming at me? I would turn tail and run!

  2. #2 Rev.Enki
    June 1, 2007

    Depends on the church. I might be *more* afraid of the bible studiers, especially if I were wearing the anti-bush teeshirt I’ve currently got on. I’d feel really goddamned nervous if I ran into a bunch of white southern baptists in a back alley right about now. Quakers or Unitarians, or liberal Methodists? Pretty safe. Pentecostals? Get me the fuck outta there.

    Another question:

    “If you were in a strange city in the USA at night and you saw ten men coming toward you, would you or would you not be relieved to know that they had just come from an American Atheists meeting?”

    Now *then* I’d feel perfectly safe.

  3. #3 Auntie Em
    June 2, 2007

    As a straight woman, probably no more or less worried by bible college students than trainee ice-cream men. But if I were gay, particularly a gay man, I think I’d feel plenty more apprehensive about the bible college students. The level of homophobia and “gay panic” stirred up by the most bigotted of christians, and the lies they tell to bolster that panic, is nauseating.

  4. #4 Tegumai Bopsulai, FCD
    June 2, 2007

    It depends. What are the Bible studiers wearing, white robes and hoods?

  5. #5 Ginger Yellow
    June 4, 2007

    “I don’t know about you, but I’d take the programmers because at least then I’d know that they won’t verbally accost me and try to sell me “the good news in the good book”. ”

    They might try to get you to watch Firefly, though.

  6. #6 Warren
    June 4, 2007

    They might try to get you to watch Firefly, though.
    Posted by: Ginger Yellow

    Ha! My thought was that if they were Apple fanatics* you might be in worse trouble than if they were hardcore JWs coming from a prayer meeting.

    ====

    * Such as myself. ;)

  7. #7 Derelict
    June 5, 2007

    Good posts. Good point about the unknown leading to a higher level of fear.

  8. #8 Sean
    June 14, 2007

    In addition to the known being less scary than the unknown, there’s also the fact that these people are coming from a session in which they read and studied a book. I suspect most of us would be more comfortable encountering a group of unknown literates who choose to spend their time in something like reflection than we would encountering a group that may not have any inclination to bury their noses in a book–any book.

  9. #9 JimFiore
    June 14, 2007

    Well, I don’t think I’d go as far as “any book”. What if they’re a bunch of skin heads reading Mien Kampf?

The site is undergoing maintenance presently. Commenting has been disabled. Please check back later!