Habitats and Humanity

Dr. Joan Bushwell's Chimpanzee Refuge

Category archives for Habitats and Humanity

How a Setback Thermostat Saves Energy

There is some confusion as to precisely how a setback thermostat saves energy. In fact, because of misunderstandings I have heard a number of people proclaim that a setback doesn’t save energy. There are two common arguments: 1. Although you save energy as the house is initially cooling during the setback period, the furnace has…

Jersey bird

The Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission (DRJTBC) recently announced the arrival of a peregrine falcon chick. The proud parents nested in the steelwork under the I-95 Scudders Falls Bridge. I traverse that bridge once a week when I’m attending my little class o’ regulatory dabbling at Temple U. It’s a heavily trafficked span, but…

Sex and the Olympic Village

A very entertaining article in The Times today regarding Olympians and sex. The author, former Olympian Matthew Syed, discusses just what goes on behind closed doors (and sometimes on rooftops) at the Olympic village. He offers the usual bag of “reasons why” (testosterone, being away from home, etc.) but it’s presented in a light and…

Wild Turkey Nest

What could’ve been the national symbol of the USA if Ben Franklin had his way, the wild turkey (meleagris gallopavo) is having a bit of a resurgence as of late. In our neck of the woods (central New York state) they have become a common sight and small bands of them are often seen crossing…

Ammonia is on the Periodic Table?

You gotta love Glenn Beck. This guy knows how to bring the crazy. On last night’s show he had a segment on hydrogen-powered cars. You can find a transcript here, about 2/3rds in (you’ll probably want to avoid the first section featuring Ben Stein unless you have vomit buckets handy). So Glenn checks out the…

Old folks tend to repeat themselves, so bear with me if this is redundant. A cursory search of Science Blogs turned up a comment in response to Razib’s post in Gene Expression that calls attention to the video of Sean B. Carroll’s 2005 HHMI Holiday Lecture on Charles Darwin and the development of the theory…

A conversation with a fellow raptor fan and Kevin’s recent entry pertaining to the injured bald eagle congealed and triggered a few of my geriatric neurons, prompting the following nostalgic reverie about a former pet: an American kestrel.

Hinckley Reservoir Revisited

In early October I posted a series of pics regarding the low water level at Hinckley Reservoir in upstate NY. The combination of low rainfall and demand had reduced the lake some 35 feet below spill level. I had hoped to post some pics in Spring 2008 to contrast these to normal levels. That won’t…

One Effect of Low Rainfall

Here in the upper Mohawk Valley of central NY, we are accustomed to an abundance of water. Heck, the city of Utica typically receives around 100 inches of snow per year and that’s nothing compared to the Tug Hill Plateau just north. The summer of 2007 has been notable for a lack of rainfall, though,…

Walk or Ride?

Is walking to the store “greener” than riding there in your car? Here’s an interesting article from The Times UK arguing for the car. The upfront argument is specious. Consider: “Driving a typical UK car for 3 miles [4.8km] adds about 0.9 kg [2lb] of CO2 to the atmosphere,” he said, a calculation based on…