Casaubon's Book

AIP Syllabus and a Quick Request

Just a reminder, my last Adapting-In-Place class for the forseeable future begins on Tuesday – here’s the syllabus if you are interested in joining us.

Week 1 – How to evaluate what you have. We’re going to concentrate on figuring out what the major concerns are for your place and your community. We’ll talk about your region and its climate, culture and resources, your house itself, your community and neighborhood – the challenges you forsee and maybe ones you haven’t thought about yet, and your personal circumstances – how much money, time and energy you have to deal with it. How does the definition of home change when we do this? We’ll also talk about when adapting in place is not an option, or when you should consider relocating, and what your options are if you do need to leave or move.

Week 2 – This week will focus on your house itself – we’ll talk primarily about low energy infrastructure for heating, cooling, cooking, lighting, washing, etc… About costs and options and choices for both private homes and for communities. We will also cover some renewable, especially low cost options. We’ll consider renting, portability and also talk about shared infrastructure.

Week 3 – We’re going to go into the walls of your building and into other mysterious home infrastructure- water, plumbing and toileting, insulation, keeping warm and cool and all the other things that your shelter does or could do for you. We’ll also talk a bit about what’s in your soil and on your property (this won’t get heavy emphasis in this class since we teach a whole class, garden design, on just this subject).

Week 4 We’ll focus on Family Issues – Sharing resources with both immediate and extended family (and chosen family), dealing with people who aren’t on board, Building collective infrastructure, cannibalizing what you have, dealing with the brother-in-law on the couch, helping kids adapt, disability, aging, college

Week 5 – We’ll talk about Finances, money, employment, making do, getting along on a shoestring, thrift, subsistence labor, starting cottage industries and businesses and community economics. This is also when we’ll talk about transportation of all sorts. We’ll also begin discussing building a set of plans – 1 year, 5 year – to adapt to different scenarios.

Week 6 – We’ll talk about Community at every level, about how to build it, what to bring to it, how to get your neighbors to help, even if they are weird. How to get along with them even if you are weird ;-), about models and ideas for bringing resilience and community to every level from the neighborhood to the state. We’ll also talk about security, dealing with unrest or violence, and try and get those plans finished.

Like all my classes the course is asynchronous and online, so you don’t need anything more than enthusiasm, an internet connection and some time to read and discuss – but you don’t have to be online at any particular time. The goal is to help you develop a plan for your family to go into a lower energy future that both allows you to protect yourself, but also to enjoy yourself.

The cost of the class is $180 or equivalent mutually agreed upon barter, and I still do have several scholarship spots for low income participants. Available.

Also, a student from New Hampshire whose name I think was Andrew emailed me to request one of the free ASPO spots, and when I tried to reply, his email was messily and hideously devoured by my computer, which smacked its lips and belched. I’m still holding this gentleman’s spot, but I no longer have his contact information, it has defeated my technical ability to get back his message. So Andrew (apologies if that isn’t your name), senior in college in NH, please email ASAP!

Sharon

Comments

  1. #1 timothy kwaku ayroe
    October 3, 2010

    i will wish to get this book