hunger

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Tag archives for hunger

Eating Poor

I was out of town when Zuska posted this piece about trying to feed a family on a food stamp budget, and I’ve been meaning to respond to her suggestion that I might have something to add for a while. The article she builds on is one in which chefs try and come up with…

It is interesting that young and unemployed (two words that are now virtually synonymous) and highly educated folks are using food stamps to buy high quality food – and taking a lot of heat for it. I can understand the visceral reaction that people have, but I also think it is fascinatingly difficult to try…

In a recent previous post “Do You Have to Grow Food” I pointed out that the impact of urban gardening is vastly greater, in the aggregate, than most people believe. We tend to think that little gardens here and there make no difference, but in fact, they add up rapidly. Consider the impact of US…

Do You Have to Grow Food?

Because of the enormous impact of agriculture on climate change, pick up any book about “green” solutions and you’ll find the suggestions that you grow a vegetable garden. Bang into the “we can’t go on as we are” end of the environmental movement (mine), and you’ll see the general assumption that growing food is part…

In many ways the enormous outpouring of support for Haiti after the earthquake was very moving. In other ways, not so much – consider the International community’s total lack of interest in whether Haitians will be able to feed themselves in the upcoming year – “We’re very happy to send our surgeons, engineers and food…

A couple of years ago, I wrote a post with the above title, about the way that biofuel and meat production in the US was pushing up world food prices. I observed, as has been documented in any number of studies, that when the world’s poorest people and the world’s richest people’s vehicles (or their…

The subject of food waste is not sexy. Anyone faced with the statistic that we waste 40% of our food in America is almost certainly appalled – for a second or two. But they also probably stop thinking about it just a tiny second later, probably after a moment of thinking “not us, though.” And…