astro

Category archives for astro

Summer continues, and the public lecture series on physics continues a pace at the Aspen Center for Physics with Dr. Catherine Heymans of the University of Edinburgh talking today on the “Dark Side of the Universe”. The talk is part of one of the three workshops currently taking place: “Testing the Laws of Gravity with…

Tabby’s Star – KIC 8462852 – remains one of the more interesting and mysterious objects in the sky. There is a good update at “Updates on Boyajian’s Star” – Astrowright’s blog and “Bradley Schaefer: Further Thoughts on the Dimming of KIC 8462852” at Centauri Dreams has the latest on the controversy over whether the star…

NASA: Senior Review 2016

Yay, NASA Senior Review is out: SeniorReviewReport_2016 tl;dr – everyone is above average, they’re good enough and we like you. bad news: per AAAC meeting earlier, there is not enough $ to actually pay for all these lovely toys, so something will have to give, somewhere. Someone at a high enough pay grade to take…

In 2011 Daniel Holz gave a Heinz R. Pagels Public Lecture at the Aspen Center for Physics on the topic of Gravitational Waves. The talk is one of the better explanations of what this is all about, with a bonus introduction!

LIGO: Useful Things

LIGO and allies have also provided a bunch of fun useful stuff: Have We Detected Gravitational Waves Yet? Stretch and Squash Black Hole Hunter Einstein@Home Gravitational Waves 101 – Markus Pössel’s excellent visualizations. The Data The Papers SXS – Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes visualizations The Chirp – courtesy of Georgia Tech GR group

LIGO explains

February 11th was a good day. I spent the day at the “Dynamics and accretion at the Galactic Center” Conference at the Aspen Center for Physics, where about 75 physicists have spent the week talking about black holes and stuff. This morning we watched the LIGO press conference, frantically deciphered the papers, and had a…

A New Kepler Orrery

Ethan Kruse has update the Kepler Orrery, just in time for Extreme Solar Systems III now under way. Enjoy

The Dance of Neptune

The Kepler 2 mission serendipitously observed Neptune about a year ago. The images were posted on the K2 website, but according to the website stat like nobody shared them, which sucks. The animation was just shown at the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting, #DPS15, in DC so it is time to show it again. Enjoy.…

As of this morning we have discovered over 1,500 exoplanets, planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. In addition to the confirmed discoveries, we have over 3,000 candidate exoplanets, most discovered by the NASA Kepler Mission through transits, where we see the shadow of a planet as it crosses in front of its parent star.…

ZUG HM HM HM

Well, that took longer than expected. Anyone still out there? Lots to talk about, eh?