Kepler

Tag archives for Kepler

I come to praise Kepler, not to bury it… The Kepler Mission is one of the little NASA spacecraft that so frequently comes along, exceeds all expectations and changes our perspective of the universe. There is a good Quick History of the transit method and Kepler Mission concept on the website. Otto Struve noted in…

exoplanetology sundries

There were a number of interesting results reported today, the start of what promises to be an interesting week: IR spectra of HR 8799 planets – Scharf at SciAm blogs reports on the Oppenheimer et al paper using the P1640 at the Palomar telescope. Their interpretation of the rather low signal-to-noise low resolution spectra is…

The shadow of a shadow of a planet… and other fun Kepler discoveries Exoplanets in Multi-body Systems in the Kepler Era is a conference currently under way at the Aspen Center for Physics The meeting is very vibrant, with a mostly very young crowd of active researchers. There have been a number of very interesting…

To Do:

Given ηEarth=1 Find more terrestrial exoplanets. Find habitable terrestrial exoplanets. Find inhabited terrestrial exoplanets. Go visit. Consider the following snippets: Kepler discover 5 planets orbiting inside 0.1 AU Kepler: A Transiting Circumbinary Planet in a Quadruple Star System Terrestrial mass planet discovered around α Cen B Kepler exoplanet survey jeopardized Kepler has lost one of…

Comparative Exoplanetology

Why do we need to spend any more effort on extra-solar planets? We found some, they’re there. Lumps of rocks, gasballs. We’re done, right? This, loosely paraphrased, was a serious question I got last week. The context was a question of why I was spending serious effort on exoplanet research, rather than focusing exclusively on…

“Name one thing robots can’t do in space that humans can!” was the challenge from a speaker at a meeting I attended many years ago. “Have babies!” was the loud and prompt reply from a grad student friend of mine at the back, thereby winning the argument to great applause. It is important to remember…

AAS: Kepler triple weirdness

Kepler announces discovery of transiting hierarchical triple. Extremely weird, with bonus cute animation…

Kepler 10-b, announced at the Annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society today, has a mass of 4.6 Earth masses and a radius of 1.4 Earth radii. Density of 8.8