Information Science

There’s been a lot around the intertubes the last few months about journal pricing and who pays what and why and reactions all around. I thought I’d gather a bit of that here for posterity, starting with the Timothy Gowers post on the UK Elsevier Big Deal numbers up to the most recent item in…

Climate Change Books

I was recently asked what books would be good to read to get up to speed on climate change. I asked around and got a few suggestions. There are several different kinds of books and the best book for you will depend on your interests. There are books about climate change itself, and books about…

The NCSE wants to give you a free chapter from the above depicted book. Click here.

I have a son who’s currently a physics undergrad. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science students might find those links interesting or…

Crickets are the first insect to now be farmed for human consumption in the United States. I’ll admit the thought of snacking on cricket flour-based chips is not exactly appetizing. But the process of farming insects over more traditional livestock seems to be less wasteful. Insect farming is a more efficient way of producing dietary protein as…

Faithful readers of this blog may recall that back in March I posted a set of slides I had prepared for a presentation to a class of undergraduate computer science majors, basically outlining what open science is and challenging them to use their talents to make science work better. Usually I don’t post the presentation…

Occupy was right: capitalism has failed the world Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for ‘irreversible collapse’? In One Stunning Graphic, NASA Shows Us What Climate Change Will Do to Earth by 2099 Exxon Mobil’s response to climate change is consummate arrogance We Should Be in a Rage Capitalism simply isn’t working and here are the…

Two recentish entries into the growing field of graphic novel scientific biographies, both very good, both suitable for a wide audience: Darwin: A Graphic Biography by Eugene Byrne and Simon Gurr and Mind Afire: The Visions of Tesla by Abigail Samoun and Elizabeth Haidle. If I had to count one of these a little bit…

I’m always interested in the present and future of libraries. There’s a steady stream of reports from various organizations that are broadly relevant to the (mostly academic) library biz but they can be tough to keep track of. I thought I’d aggregate some of those here. Of course I’ve very likely missed a few, so…

Why Fortran Lives

Julia is a nifty new language being developed at MIT I stole this plot from github, it shows Julia’s current performance on some standard benchmarks compared to a number of favourite tools like Python, Java and R. Normalized to optimized C code. And, there, in a single plot, is why Real Programmers still use Fortran…!