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Occupational Health News Roundup

McDonald’s ruling could be a major turning point for the fast food worker movement; federal commission clarifies rules for pregnant workers; miners with black lung may have been wrongly denied benefits; and a new OSHA whistleblower partnership is launched to support commercial carrier workers.

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on July 21 at a construction site in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

When Bethany Boggess first debuted her online mapping project, she didn’t expect it to attract so much attention. But within just six months of its launch, people from all over the world are sending in reports and helping her build a dynamic picture of the lives and deaths of workers.

OSHA gave me a reason to visit at Recovery.gov

An OSHA news release about a cell tower inspection gave me reason to visit the White House’s Recovery.gov website.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Workers at an Alabama car seat manufacturer speak out about workplace illnesses; worker death at a Pennsylvania sugar plant could have been prevented; Los Angeles activists join fight for a living wage; and income inequality gets a laugh.

Last year, the U.S. Census reported that record numbers of people were living in poverty. But along with overall poverty numbers, the Census recently reported that concentrated poverty is up, too — and that’s worrisome because it means that more people may face even greater barriers and fewer opportunities to moving out of poverty.

Not an “accident”: Chandler Warren suffers fatal work-related injury at FedEx Hub, Memphis, TN 

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality. This one occurred on July 2 at FedEx’s flagship sorting facility in Memphis, Tennessee.

Safety whistleblowers on Warren Buffett’s railroad

Tony Schick of Oregon Public Broadcasting profiles the experience of BNSF railway employees who blow the whistle on safety problems.

Text of the ad we’re running for our searches this fall. This will go live on the usual sites at the start of August, but as a sort of experiment in the power of social media, I’m going to share it here first, and see what that gets us. —— We invite applications for two…

Crystalline silica, hydrofluoric acid and formaldehyde. Those are just three of the dozens of air toxic chemicals that oil companies have used thousands of times in southern California in just the past year.