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Occupational Health News Roundup

A peek inside the life of Miami’s hotel housekeepers during spring break; a tie vote at the Supreme Court is a win for labor unions; California on track to adopt statewide minimum wage of $15; and Los Angeles nurses go on strike for safer working conditions.

Who’s saying what about OSHA’s new silica standard

Here are some of my favorite quotes in response to OSHA publishing a final rule on silica dust.

“Sorry it took so long”: OSHA issues rule to protect workers exposed to silica dust

JT Knuckles was 58 years old when he died from silicosis in 1998. I’m remembering him today as OSHA announces a new regulation to protect silica-exposed workers.

Yearning for the footnotes: OSHA report on amputations, severe injuries

A new OSHA report recaps the agency’s first year receiving reports of amputations and hospitalizations. OSHA shields the companies from scrutiny by not mentioning their names.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Vox explores the mental health impact of medical errors on health care workers; California policymaker announces efforts to protect women janitors from sexual assault; farmworkers call on fast food chain Wendy’s to join the Fair Food Program for better wages; and a judge upholds a worker’s social media rights.

Not an “accident”: Albert James Speed, 25 suffers fatal work-related injury in McCalla, AL

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, March 4 in McCalla, AL.

Making the case for safer paint strippers

A painter named Jason, who nearly died from using a methylene chloride-based paint stripper, teams up with the California Department of Public Health to make the case for using safer alternatives.

It seems obvious that workers with paid sick leave are more likely to stay home and seek out medical care when they or a family member is ill. But it’s always good to confirm a hunch with some solid data.

Fatal work injury that killed Ascencion Medina, 44, was preventable, SC-OSHA cites G M Framing

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Ascencion Molina Medina, 44, could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Occupational Health News Roundup

State investigations at New York nail salons uncover widespread violations; Oklahoma regulators rule that state law allowing employers to opt out of workers’ compensation is unconstitutional; EPA proposes new safety rules for chemical facilities; and reporters at Reuters investigate labor brokers who recruit and exploit foreign workers.