Christina's LIS Rant

Archives for April, 2010

Mixed methods are always attractive, but many researchers give up because each method typically requires some epistemology which often conflicts with the epistemology of other methods. When mixed methods are done, they are often done in sequence. For example, qualitative work to understand enough about a phenomenon to develop a survey or interviewing survey respondents …

When I joined ScienceBlogs, I was halfway done preparing for my comprehensive exams. That involved a lot of reading, re-reading, and then practice essays. I blogged that to stay honest – you could see weeks that I didn’t accomplish as much as well as pretty productive weeks. I also got some great feedback from readers…

I was happy to see that the authors published this article in PlosOne. I was following their work a while ago, but had lost track (plus, when asked, the last author implied that they had moved on to new projects). So here’s the citation and then I’ll summarize and comment. Divoli, A., Wooldridge, M., &…

V. brief post. Jonathan Rochkind points out that a lot of libraries are doing mobile sites and things, but he questions if they actually have a reason to think that these services are needed and will be used or if they are just creating these things because they’re cool. Please read his post, and let…

The following is by Susan Fingerman. She and I were discussing all of the media commentary, so when I heard she actually read it, I asked – no, make that begged – for a review. She was kind enough to supply. By now many of you have probably heard about This Book is Overdue: How…

Quick evil empire round-up

I expect D to have a more thorough take (she always does!), but there’s finally a more widespread outcry against Ebsco. A few of us commented about the exclusive rights to magazines and closing access to Ageline. There was also (rightfully) a kerfuffle about deep linking to HBS articles. Now we hear from Meredith Farkas…

Types of recommender systems

I’m still on this kick on recommender systems. I’m further encouraged by happening on a report on “discoverability” by the Minnesota librarians when looking for something else on JR’s blog. The report agrees that recommender systems are a more important trend. In standard information retrieval stuff, you’re going from whatever query the person puts in…