bibliometrics

Christina's LIS Rant

Category archives for bibliometrics

Inappropriate citations?

Kevin Zelnio of Deep Sea News tweeted the title of this piece and sent my mind going over the various theories of citation, what citations mean, studies showing how people cite without reading (pdf) (or at least propagate obvious citation errors), and also how people use things but don’t cite them in certain fields… I…

Mixed methods are always attractive, but many researchers give up because each method typically requires some epistemology which often conflicts with the epistemology of other methods. When mixed methods are done, they are often done in sequence. For example, qualitative work to understand enough about a phenomenon to develop a survey or interviewing survey respondents …

I ran across this piece again just now after having read it when it first came out in 20056: Foster, I. (2005). Service-Oriented Science. Science, 308(5723), 814-817. doi:10.1126/science.1110411 It’s a good piece and quite helpful. Google Scholar says it’s been cited 209 times, so that’s not terribly surprising. But here are some things that are…

In most of the discussions of using usage as a metric of scholarly impact, the example of the clinician is given.  The example goes that medical articles might be heavily used and indeed have a huge impact on practice (saving lives), but be uncited. There are other fields that have practitioners who pull from the…

One of the open problems in article level metrics is how to automate, quantify, and describe the exposure an article has had in popular science pieces in newspapers and general science magazines. Peter Binfield (PLoS) and Alexis-Michel Mugabushaka. (European Research Council) both brought this up at the NSF Workshop I attended yesterday. I agree that…

stream of consciousness notes from this meeting I attended in DC, Wednesday December 16, 2009 Final panel Oren Beit-Arie (Ex Libris Group), Todd Carpenter (NISO),Lorcan Dempsey (OCLC),Tony Hey (Microsoft Research),Clifford Lynch (CNI),Don Waters (Andrew W. Mellon foundation) introduction from Cliff Lynch – gets requests for tenure reviews – he takes these very seriously. Got one…

Continuing stream of consciousness notes from this workshop held in DC, Wednesday December 16, 2009 Alexis-Michel Mugabushaka. (European Research Council) – intertwined research funding structures at national and European level. At the national level two main funding modes – institutional (block research funding of higher ed institutions), and competitive. Orgs structured at European level –…

this continues my stream of consciousness notes from the workshop held in DC, December 16, 2009. Peter Binfield (PLOS) – article level metrics. Not talking about OA, not talking about journal level.  Journal is just packaging, and shouldn’t necessarily judge articles by the packaging. PLoS ONE has half a percent to all the publications that…

Continuing my stream of consciousness notes from this meeting in DC, Wednesday, December 16, 2009. Jevin D West (U Washington, Eigenfactor) – biology and bibliometrics. biology has a lot of problems that are studied looking at networks. From ecosystems to genomes. They want to take these huge networks and be able to tell stories. The…

I attended this one-day workshop in DC on Wednesday, December 16, 2009. These are stream of consciousness notes. Herbert Van de Sompel (LANL) – intro – Lots of metrics: some accepted in some areas and not others, some widely available on platforms in the information industry and others not. How are these metrics selected? Why…