scholarly communication

Christina's LIS Rant

Category archives for scholarly communication

My larger institution’s (so not my place of work, but our parent org’s) libraries had a fabulous get together Friday with a session on data curation. The speakers were: Clifford Lynch of the Coalition for Networked Information, Carole Palmer from UIUC, and Joel Bader from JHU and JHMI. I tweeted, but there wasn’t a hashtag,…

Here’s a quote from the Professional and Scholarly Publishing division of the Association of American Publishers’ response (pdf) to the FRPAA legislation (about): There is no need for federal agencies to replicate content on their own sites when web-linking approaches to publishers’ authoritative versions could serve better the same goal of public access. Acting on…

Revere of Effects Measure has a great post on expertise, authorship, and “real” names. At this point, after years and years of blogs it’s a shame this has to be said explicitly. The general points go like this: there are many legitimate reasons to be pseudonymous in authoring a blog. I describe some of these…

Linking to a must read

I ♥♥♥ this essay by Barbara Fister: Washington, We Have a Problem at Library Journal. Go read it.

More on Geobloggers

Anne Jefferson from Highly Allochthonous pointed me to a new essay from Geoscientist Online, the member magazine of the Geological Society (UK). That essay points both to the survey of women geobloggers (previously mentioned here) and a survey done by Lutz Geissler, Robert Huber, and Callan Bentley. (probably haven’t mentioned before). In the Geoscientist essay…

Mixed methods are always attractive, but many researchers give up because each method typically requires some epistemology which often conflicts with the epistemology of other methods. When mixed methods are done, they are often done in sequence. For example, qualitative work to understand enough about a phenomenon to develop a survey or interviewing survey respondents…

Sometimes you have to just let go and release something to the wild. I have mentioned on a few occasions a qualitative study I did prior to the network study. To be honest, I think I actually did it in the Fall of 2007 ?! I thought (and was encouraged to believe) that I could…

ROTFL (and crying a bit)

This thread is hilarious, yet so true it makes me want to cry.

At the PSP Pre-Conference (see my notes), Dr. Harley of the Higher Education in the Digital Age program reported being surprised by their finding that young scholars were unwilling or unlikely to experiment with new scholarly communication (tools/practices/channels). There was a question from the audience that showed the person’s disbelief of this finding. No matter…

These are a continuation of my notes. This portion has been transcribed from my scribble – I was sitting on stage for the second half of the day so live blogging didn’t really seem appropriate If there is something wrong, not malicious, just bad handwriting. Diane Harley, Senior Researcher and Director, Higher Education in…