Archives for June, 2010

“I thought I better come see the bears because the next time I am in this country they will be all gone.” – Polar bear tourist in Churchill, Man. Ecotourism. Sounds so responsible, or least, non-exploitative. But let’s face it: Anyone who flies long-distance to get close to some endangered piece of nature at risk…

The credibility factor

The more peer-reviewed papers a climatologist has published and the more often those papers are cited, the more likely it is that the researcher supports the science underpinning anthropogenic climate change (ACC). That’s the conclusion of a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This comes as absolutely no…

Few stories about climatology generated as much attention, positive and negative as one by Jonathan Leake in London’s Sunday Times back in January. “UN climate panel shamed by bogus rainforest claim” claimed that references to threats to the Amazon rainforest from global warming were “based on an unsubstantiated claim by green campaigners who had little…

A global warming fix

From WaPo‘s Toles comes the ultimate answer to our climate problems:

What happened at Three Mile Island in 1979 led to a new regulatory environment that increased the costs of building and running nuclear power reactors in the U.S. The environment was so hostile to the industry that no new reactors have been ordered since then. There are several in the planning stages, but none have…

Obama’s speech

The most intelligent thing I’ve read so far about Obama’s speech Tuesday night, the one that included not a single mention of climate change, comes from Ezra Klein at the Washington Post. He’s talking about the assumption that fear doesn’t motivation people, only inspiration does. But that strikes me as depressing evidence of how unlikely…

The latest report from the National Climatic Data Center reminds us that the planet is continuing to warm as expected. Most of the attention will be afforded to the global picture, for good reason:

In a desperate bid to help staunch the propagation of a particularly insidious meme, I offer this attempt to help clear up any confusion: Mike Hulme and Martin Mahony of the School of Environmental Sciences University at East Anglia have a paper forthcoming in Progress in Physical Geography that explores the IPCC, “its origins and…

Beyond Smoke and Mirrors

I’ve never been completely comfortable using the fate of small island states — places like Tuvalu and Kiribati and the Seycelles that might be the first to go under as sea levels rise — as poster kids for the consequences of climate change. For one thing, as difficult as it would be for their populations…