A Blog Around The Clock

It’s been a while since I last blogged about the Bosnian Pyramid (I did follow the story superficially, though, but was sick of trolls attracted to the topic), but I have to break the silence for this piece of good news:

The Culture Ministry found the “research” conducted by Osmanagic’s team to be questionable and the collaborators of Osmanagic to lack the credibility needed to allow for continued funding of their “project.” Also criticized by the Bosnian government, according to Javno, is the methods by which Osmanagic et al presented their findings, particularly the fact that they routinely kept their data from experts in relative fields.

The Bosnian Culture Ministry consulted experts including those in the fields of geology, mining, archaeology, and cultural preservation and arrived at the conclusion that Osmanagic’s foundation was not acting in the best interest of Bosnian cultural preservation and that the foundation is in violation of archaeological regulations. The Ministry even concluded that the nature of Osmanagic’s registration with the Bosnia-Herzegovina Justice Ministry may be suspect and should be “looked into.”

They are shutting Osmanagic down. Whew – that took a long time, but at least the story has (so far) a happy ending. In the end, Reason prevailed.

Comments

  1. #1 Irna
    June 30, 2007

    Hi Bora,
    unfortunately I’m not so sure that it is the end of the story, or that Reason prevailed as you put it. If you take a look at the local on-line newspapers, you’ll see that Osmanagic still has got a strong support from the political establishment at the cantonal level. He cannot excavate on Visocica anymore, but he will probably get excavation permits for the other places (Pljesevica, Vratnica and so on). Even at the federal level (concerning the protected zone of Visocica) I fear that the Minister Grahovac is much alone, and I guess there must be strong pressions on him.
    Looking at it from France, the whole story seems totally unbelievable; here Osmanagic would never have obtained any authorization to begin with. But I’m beginning to believe that in Bosnia everything is possible, even what seems to be the least “reasonable”!
    Irna

  2. #2 Proud Bosnian
    June 30, 2007

    Comment deleted by the owner. I will delete nationalistic crap!

  3. #3 hercegovac
    June 30, 2007

    Comment deleted for nationalistic spam.

  4. #4 hercegovac
    June 30, 2007

    Deleted because nationalistic spam.

    One more mention of “my pyramid is bigger than yours” or a slide into an unrelated Israel topic (in reference to either Serbia or my country of USA), and I am closing the comments.

  5. #5 Planet B
    June 30, 2007

    Ah, yes, fortified academia maintains the status quo because they can’t go about finding evidence that their version of human history is incorrect. I think you are wrong, my friend, and one day we will all know that this IS a pyramid… and have to re-write the history books.

    It’s amazing how adamant academics are that they can’t possibly be wrong about something… so much so that they refuse to actually examine the evidence.

  6. #6 coturnix
    June 30, 2007

    It’s amazing how adamant anti-intellectuals are when they clutch at straws that they feel somehow make their tribe feel superior!

  7. #7 Solomon
    July 1, 2007

    History books are being rewritten all the time. Those nationalistic spammers should learn from them.

  8. #8 Bill Siemer
    July 2, 2007

    This has been an interesting story. I too don’t believe it is over. There has been more arguments than research. It would be nice if the areas involved could be excavated to conculsion. They might find evidence that proves one way or the other what was going on and when. I hope they prove that the structures are man-made. If not, little has been lost and there has been a much needed boost to the local economy.

  9. #9 coturnix
    July 2, 2007

    Actually, the quack is actively destroying the existing archaeological treasure at the site while excavating for the imaginary pyramid, something that has been exhaustively documented (see the links at the beginning of the post and links within links). So, the laconic “let’s wait and see” is in itself a destructive position to take.

  10. #10 hercegovac
    July 2, 2007

    “Looking at it from France, the whole story seems totally unbelievable; here Osmanagic would never have obtained any authorization to begin with. But I’m beginning to believe that in Bosnia everything is possible, even what seems to be the least “reasonable”!”

    You don’t allow bigger pyramids in Bosnia than in France, but you allow France better than Bosnia!???

    Excellent criteteria, compliments!!!

  11. #11 coturnix
    July 2, 2007

    Everyone who thinks that having a bigger (yet false) pyramid is better than having a rational government and reasonable people, is working against the reputation of Bosnia, something that is badly needed after a decade of wars, devastation, and negative media attention.

  12. #12 nature
    July 2, 2007

    I would understand minister Grahovac if he offered any, and I mean ANY other archealogical research on mentioned place. By the goverment and goverment related “scientists” the hill itself contains the old city. I do not see a reason why not go ahead and research and escavate the city itself? It seems that they just want to stop Osmanagic but are not willing to go further than their offices in Sarajevo. The fact of the matter is that hill Visocisa is hiding something. What that something is we might never know…

  13. #13 Irna
    July 3, 2007

    “By the goverment and goverment related “scientists” the hill itself contains the old city. I do not see a reason why not go ahead and research and escavate the city itself?”
    Maybe because there is much more urgent to do with the few money they have ? Here is for instance a list of 20 monuments of international cultural value that are threatened of partial or total destruction : http://www.coe.int/T/E/Cultural_Co-operation/Heritage/Technical_Co-operation_and_Consultancy/3._Projects_and_Programmes/IRPPSAAH_PIL-BIH.pdf?L=E. What is under the soil is not really threatened – except of course by Osmanagic himself, and archaeologists usually prefer *not* to dig than to dig in a wrong way, with too little money and means.
    Irna

  14. #14 Nex
    July 3, 2007

    I’ve read an interesting article on Bosnian Pyramid about the corners of the pyramid. It would be an easy way to proof quickly the existence, but they dig near the corners but not the corners. Then they’ve dug something on the top of it, but not the top!? I’ve seen some pictures on Bosnian Pyramid Photo Gallery that really let me think again about this whole thing. Every day I believe less in this mystery.

  15. #15 Dejan
    July 25, 2007

    Why don’t just dig and see. I think would be great if there is pyramid in Bosnia. It would help us learn more about history of civilisation and it would defenetly be a richer history.

  16. #16 Dejan
    July 25, 2007

    Looking at the photos it does look like there is some construction there (it might be a pyramid). I don’t understand why is West so reluctant to invest in research of it. Even if it is not a pyramid, it is something man made and significant.

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