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My picks from ScienceDaily

Religion Colors Americans’ Views Of Nanotechnology:

Is nanotechnology morally acceptable? For a significant percentage of Americans, the answer is no, according to a recent survey of Americans’ attitudes about the science of the very small.

Male Fertility May Be Harmed By Mix Of Endocrine Disrupters:

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals, which are harmless individually in small doses, can together be a dangerous cocktail. Concurrent exposure to several endocrine-disrupting substances may, among other things, result in malformed sexual organs. Risk assessments of chemical substances should therefore take potential cocktail effects into account.

Two Oxygenation Events In Ancient Oceans Sparked Spread Of Complex Life:

The rise of oxygen and the oxidation of deep oceans between 635 and 551 million years ago may have had an impact on the increase and spread of the earliest complex life, including animals, according to a new study.

Krill Discovered Living In The Antarctic Abyss:

Scientists have discovered Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) living and feeding down to depths of 3000 metres in the waters around the Antarctic Peninsula. Until now this shrimp-like crustacean was thought to live only in the upper ocean. The discovery completely changes scientists’ understanding of the major food source for fish, squid, penguins, seals and whales.

Empty Nest Syndrome May Not Be Bad After All, Study Finds:

One day they are crawling, the next day they are driving and then suddenly they aren’t kids anymore. As children reach adulthood, the parent-child relationship changes as parents learn to adapt to newly independent children. A new study by a University of Missouri professor explored the differences in how mothers and fathers interacted with their young adult children. She found there were few differences in the way mothers and fathers felt and that many of the changes were positive, despite the perception that mothers in particular fall apart and experience the so-called empty nest syndrome.

Zoologists Challenge Longstanding Theory That ‘Eyespots’ Mimic The Eyes Of Predators’ Enemies:

Circular markings on creatures such as butterflies are effective against predators because they are conspicuous features, not because they mimic the eyes of the predators’ own enemies, according to research in the journal, Behavioral Ecology*. Zoologists based at the University of Cambridge challenge the 150-year-old theory about why these markings are effective against predators.

Busy Beavers Can Help Ease Drought:

They may be considered pests, but beaver can help mitigate the effects of drought, and because of that, their removal from wetlands to accommodate industrial, urban and agricultural demands should be avoided, according to a new University of Alberta study.