A Blog Around The Clock

Why Are Computational Neuroscience and Systems Biology So Separate?:

Despite similar computational approaches, there is surprisingly little interaction between the computational neuroscience and the systems biology research communities. In this review I reconstruct the history of the two disciplines and show that this may explain why they grew up apart. The separation is a pity, as both fields can learn quite a bit from each other. Several examples are given, covering sociological, software technical, and methodological aspects. Systems biology is a better organized community which is very effective at sharing resources, while computational neuroscience has more experience in multiscale modeling and the analysis of information processing by biological systems. Finally, I speculate about how the relationship between the two fields may evolve in the near future.

Hmmm, perhaps in some areas of biology, but I saw a great exception (there are two other exceptions noted in the first comment on the paper as well).

Ten Simple Rules for Aspiring Scientists in a Low-Income Country:

Being a scientist entails a common set of characteristics. Admiring nature and having concern for social issues; possessing a strong academic background, team work abilities, honesty, discipline, skepticism, communication skills, competitiveness, ability to accept and give criticism, and productive relationships are some of the most obvious traits that scientists should have. To be a scientist in a low-income country (LIC), however, requires a complementary set of qualities that are necessary to confront the drawbacks that work against the development of science. The failure of many young researchers to mature as professional scientists upon their return to their country from advanced training elsewhere, motivated us to propose these ten rules.

This is something I’ll forwards to my scientist friends in Belgrade….