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ScienceOnline09 – arts and humanities

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Let’s look at few other sessions on the Program – on topics that are rarely seen at either tech or science meetings:

Art and science — online and offline:

This session is moderated by Jessica Palmer and Glendon Mellow:

Art is not just illustration. And it is not the opposite of science (“Two Cultures”). How can the two work together and help each other?

Web and the History of Science:

This session is moderated by GG, Brian Switek, Scicurious and John McKay:

Why is History of Science important for scientists? How to blog about it. How does Open Access and the Web in general (Google Books in particular, for example) help/hinder the work of professional historians of science?

Science Fiction on Science Blogs?:

This session is moderated by Stephanie Zvan and Peggy Kolm:

Science fiction has inspired curiosity and enthusiasm in generations of children. How can science bloggers draw on SF’s power to entertain and educate? What science can we find in fiction beyond the old multi-page calculations of rocket trajectories? What does the practice of science look like in SF? In the past, scientists like Asimov and Clarke were the ones writing SF. Who’s producing the good stuff these days, and what makes a good bad example? Many modern SF writers blog too. What opportunities exist for cross-promotion and educating the writers? And which bloggers are already doing it all right?

Comments

  1. #1 Blake Stacey
    October 29, 2008

    Snow’s “Two Cultures” were a description, not a prescription, so if we want to make that division obsolete, all we have to do is change human behaviour! It’s so simple, really.

    How can science bloggers draw on SF’s power to entertain and educate? What science can we find in fiction beyond the old multi-page calculations of rocket trajectories?

    And why am I procrastinating in the blogohedron instead of working on my science-fiction novel? Sigh.

  2. #2 Stephanie Z
    October 30, 2008

    Blake, maybe because I don’t know a single science fiction writer who doesn’t? It appears to be endemic to the breed.

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