A Blog Around The Clock

Archives for December, 2008

Happy New Year

New and Exciting in PLoS ONE

There are 12 new articles in PLoS ONE today. As always, you should rate the articles, post notes and comments and send trackbacks when you blog about the papers. You can now also easily place articles on various social services (CiteULike, Connotea, Stumbleupon, Facebook and Digg) with just one click. Here are my own picks…

Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference: Greg Laden is an anthropologist, a part time independent scholar and part time associate adviser with the Program for Individualized Learning at the the University of Minnesota and a prolific SciBling blogger. He will be on the panel Hey, You Can’t Say That!…

A Year in Cities, 2008

An ongoing meme [From, via] – list of cities/towns in which I have spent at least one night during 2008 (asterisk for places where I slept on non-consecutive nights): New York City, NY* Destin, FL London, UK Cambridge, UK* Watford, UK Cromer, UK Trieste, Italy Belgrade, Serbia Berlin, Germany A very Euro-focused year, compared with…

See the discussion about identification of this strange animal here. Is it correct?

My picks from ScienceDaily

Clock Quotes

Remembrance, like a candle, burns brightest at Christmas Time. – Charles Dickens

Radical Transparency

This article is almost two years old, but it is perhaps even more current today than it was when it first appeared: Pretend for a second that you’re a CEO. Would you reveal your deepest, darkest secrets online? Would you confess that you’re an indecisive weakling, that your colleagues are inept, that you’re not really…

Every now and then I mention light pollution on this blog, usually from a biologist’s perspective. But here is another perspective – using “dark sky” as a tourist attraction – a place where one can actually see the stars: Nonetheless, Galloway Forest Park contains the darkest skies in Europe, and Steve Owens, co-coordinator of the…

Hopebuilding and Storytelling

On the Hopebuilding’s Weblog, Rosemary wrote: When I was a journalist, many years ago now, it never really occurred to me that we spent much more time on “bad news” than on “good news”. In fact, sometimes people caricatured the “good news” attempts as being Pollyanna-ish; they thought “good” news was not really news. But…