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My picks from ScienceDaily

Giant Dinosaur Posture Is All Wrong: Sauropods Held Their Heads High, Research Finds:

Famous depictions of the largest of all known dinosaurs, from film and television to museum skeletons, have almost certainly got it wrong, according to new research.

Oldest Evidence Of Leprosy Found In India:

A biological anthropologist from Appalachian State University working with an undergraduate student from Appalachian, an evolutionary biologist from UNC Greensboro, and a team of archaeologists from Deccan College (Pune, India) recently reported analysis of a 4000-year-old skeleton from India bearing evidence of leprosy. This skeleton represents both the earliest archaeological evidence for human infection with Mycobacterium leprae in the world and the first evidence for the disease in prehistoric India.

New Extinct Lemur Species Discovered In Madagascar:

A third species of Palaeopropithecus, an extinct group of large lemurs, has just been uncovered in the northwest of Madagascar by a Franco-Madagascan team. Dubbed Palaeopropithecus kelyus, this new specimen is smaller than the two species of these ‘large sloth lemurs’ already known and its diet made up of harder-textured foodstuffs. This discovery supports the idea of a richer biodiversity in recent prehistory (late Pleistocene and beginning of the Holocene).

Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude: Neurobiology Of Musicality Related To Intrinsic Attachment Behavior:

Music is social communication between individuals — humming of lullabies attach infant to parent and singing or playing music adds croup cohesion. The neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior, suggests a recent Finnish study. The study gives new information about genetic background of musical aptitude.

Scientists Reaching Consensus On How Brain Processes Speech:

Neuroscientists feel they are much closer to an accepted unified theory about how the brain processes speech and language, according to a scientist at Georgetown University Medical Center who first laid the concepts a decade ago and who has now published a review article confirming the theory.

Microfossils Challenge Prevailing Views Of ‘Snowball Earth’ Glaciations On Life:

New fossil findings discovered by scientists at UC Santa Barbara challenge prevailing views about the effects of “Snowball Earth” glaciations on life, according to an article in the June issue of the journal Nature Geoscience.

Premature Ejaculation May Be A Genetic Disorder:

Premature ejaculation can be embarrassing, but a new study suggests that it might be a genetic disorder.

Half Of Your Friends Lost In Seven Years, Social Network Study Finds:

Had a good chat with someone recently? Has a good friend just helped you to do up your home? Then you will be lucky if that person still does that in seven years time. Sociologist Gerald Mollenhorst investigated how the context in which we meet people influences our social network. One of his conclusions: you lose about half of your close network members every seven years.

Lessons From The Vaccine-autism Wars:

Researchers long ago rejected the theory that vaccines cause autism, yet many parents don’t believe them. Can scientists bridge the gap between evidence and doubt?

More Genetic Differences Between Mice And Humans Than Previously Thought:

A new article in PLoS Biology explores exactly what distinguishes the human genome from that of the lab mouse. In the first comprehensive comparison between the genes of mice and humans, scientists from institutions across America, Sweden and the UK reveal that there are more genetic differences between the two species than had been previously thought.