A Blog Around The Clock

i-d1e5d30e0a11cbee71c55d06fbd379a5-2010-logo-small1.jpgWWW2010 is starting tonight. Interested to know more about it? Sure, here’s the brief history:

The World Wide Web was first conceived in 1989 by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The first conference of the series, WWW1, was held at CERN in 1994 and organized by Robert Cailliau. The IW3C2 was founded by Joseph Hardin and Robert Cailliau later in 1994 and has been responsible for the conference series ever since. Except for 1994 and 1995 when two conferences were held each year, WWWn became an annual event held in late April or early May. The location of the conference rotates among North America, Europe, and Asia. In 2001 the conference designator changed from a number (1 through 10) to the year it is held; i.e., WWW11 became known as WWW2002, and so on.

The WWW Conference series aims to provide the world a premier forum for discussion and debate about the evolution of the Web, the standardization of its associated technologies, and the impact of those technologies on society and culture. The conferences bring together researchers, developers, users and commercial ventures – indeed all who are passionate about the Web and what it has to offer.

Yup. this is the Web conference. See the schedule. And this year it is in my backyard, in Raleigh NC. Now, I do not have time nor money to attend the whole thing. But, the WWW2010 has a few simultaneous conferences happening at the same place and time, for more affordable prices, featuring some of the same people (and others one can bump into in the hallways) and some very exciting topics.

So, there is a Web Science Conference 2010 which has at least two interesting papers presented:

Understanding how Twitter is used to widely spread Scientific Messages (PDF) by Julie Letierce, Alexandre Passant, John Breslin and Stefan Decke, and Studying Scientific Discourse on the Web using Bibliometrics: A Chemistry Blogging Case Study (PDF) by Paul Groth and Thomas Gurney. Both papers will be given tomorrow, on Monday at 2pm. But I did not register for this part, so I cannot see these.

But I will go to the FutureWeb conference on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday – the registration also works for the Plenary Talks of the main WWW2010 conference. And I will livetweet and then blog from it all three days.

FutureWeb is on Twitter and Facebook. They will have daily video/written coverage and a blog. The hashtag is #fw2010.

The official hashtag for the main WWW2010 conference is #www2010 and for the other two co-conferences is #websci10 and #w4a10.