Chronobiology

A Blog Around The Clock

Category archives for Chronobiology

What it really means when we are talking about babies “sleeping through the night” (from September 22, 2005)

The fourth part of a four-part series on the topic, this one from April 02, 2006….

SRBR – Day 2

As you know, I am currently in Florida, at the 20th Anniversary meeting of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms, that is, my own society. I have not been since 2002, so I am surprised to see how many people remember may face and are happy to see me. I am also surprised to…

More on sleep in adolescents

This is the third part of the series on the topic, from April 01, 2006…

SRBR – Day 1

I just had nice seafood dinner while watching the sunset over the water with this guy, down in sunny Florida. Readers of this blog have met him before, here and here. I also saw Erik Herzog, who is familiar to all of you from, e.g., here, here, here and here. I heard him give a…

Sleep Schedules in Adolescents

Earlier this year, during the National Sleep Awareness Week, I wrote a series of posts about the changes in sleep schedules in adolescents. Over the next 3-4 hours, I will repost them all, starting with this one from March 26, 2006. Also check my more recent posts on the subject here and here…

My regular readers are probably aware that the topic of adolescent sleep and the issue of starting times of schools are some of my favourite subjects for a variety of reasons: I am a chronobiologist, I am an extreme “owl” (hence the name of this blog), I am a parent of developing extreme “owls”, I…

Do sponges have circadian clocks?

Much of the biological research is done in a handful of model organisms. Important studies in organisms that can help us better understand the evolutionary relationships on a large scale tend to be hidden far away from the limelight of press releases and big journals. Here’s one example (March 30, 2006):

Oxytocin and Childbirth. Or not.

When teaching human or animal physiology, it is very easy to come up with examples of ubiqutous negative feedback loops. On the other hand, there are very few physiological processes that can serve as examples of positive feedback. These include opening of the ion channels during the action potential, the blood clotting cascade, emptying of…

This post from March 27, 2006 starts with some of my old research and poses a new hypothesis.