Clock Zoo

A Blog Around The Clock

Category archives for Clock Zoo

Whenever I read a paper from Karl-Arne Stokkan’s lab, and I have read every one of them, no matter how dense the scientese language I always start imagining them running around the cold, dark Arctic, wielding enormous butterfly nets, looking for and catching reindeer (or ptarmigans, whichever animal the paper is about) to do their…

If you ever glanced at the circadian literature, you have probably encountered the statement that “circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in living systems”. In all of my formal and informal writing I qualified that statement somewhat, stating something along the lines of “most organisms living on or near the Earth’s surface have circadian rhythms”. Why? In…

Most people are aware that social insects, like honeybees, have three “sexes”: queens, drones and workers. Drones are males. Their only job is to fly out and mate with the queen after which they drop dead. Female larvae fed ‘royal jelly’ emerge as queens. After mating, the young queen takes a bunch of workers with…

Long-time readers of this blog remember that, some years ago, I did a nifty little study on the Influence of Light Cycle on Dominance Status and Aggression in Crayfish. The department has moved to a new building, the crayfish lab is gone, I am out of science, so chances of following up on that study…

As I announced this morning, there will be several guest posts here over the next several weeks. The first one, by Barn Owl of the lovely Guadalupe Storm-Petrel blog, is likely to appeal to a lot of my readers as it combines several of my own interests: ==================== In this guest-post for A Blog Around…

Glow worms glimmer on cue: University of Queensland researcher and lecturer Dr David Merritt has discovered that Tasmanian cave glow-worms are energy conservationists: they switch their lights off at night-time. The discovery was made during a partially funded UQ Firstlink study, which revealed that the glow-worm’s prey-luring light output is governed by circadian rhythms, regardless…

Believe it or not, this appears to have something to do with their circadian rhythms! Back in the 1960s and early 1970s, there was quite a lot of research published on the circadian rhythms in earthworms, mostly by Miriam Bennett. As far as I can tell, nobody’s followed up on that work since. I know,…

Fifth in the five-part series on clocks in bacteria, covering more politics than biology (from May 17, 2006):

Fourth in the five-part series on clocks in bacteria (from April 30, 2006):

The third installment in the five-part series on clocks in bacteria (from April 19, 2006):