Clock Zoo

A Blog Around The Clock

Category archives for Clock Zoo

Second post in a series of five (from April 05, 2006):

First in a series of five posts on clocks in bacteria (from March 08, 2006)…

Circadian Clocks in Microorganisms

The first in a series of posts on circadian clocks in microorganisms (from February 23, 2006)…

Daily Rhythms in Cnidaria

The origin and early evolution of circadian clocks are far from clear. It is now widely believed that the clocks in cyanobacteria and the clocks in Eukarya evolved independently from each other. It is also possible that some Archaea possess clock – at least they have clock genes, thought to have arived there by lateral…

Do sponges have circadian clocks?

Much of the biological research is done in a handful of model organisms. Important studies in organisms that can help us better understand the evolutionary relationships on a large scale tend to be hidden far away from the limelight of press releases and big journals. Here’s one example (March 30, 2006):

We have recently covered interesting reproductive adaptations in mammals, birds, insects, flatworms, plants and protists. For the time being (until I lose inspiration) I’ll try to leave cephalopod sex to the experts and the pretty flower sex to the chimp crew. In the meantime, I want to cover another Kingdom – the mysterious world of…

It has been almost three years since I promised to write a post detailing the photoperiodic response in mammals. (Birds are more complicated). Now Shelley gives a good example – the snowshoe hare which changes color annually: it is dark in summer and white in winter. It is pretty easy to remember – it’s all…

I had no time to read this in detail and write a really decent overview here, perhaps I will do it later, but for now, here are the links and key excerpts from a pair of exciting new papers in PLoS Biology and PLoS ONE, which describe the patterns of expression of a second type…

Me and the Copperheads

Last week I had lunch with a good old friend of mine, Jim Green. He got his degree in Zoology, then a law degree (patent law) and is now coming back for yet another degree in biological and chemical engineering. He did his research on snakes, so we reminisced and laughed about the time several…

Do sponges have circadian clocks?

Much of the biological research is done in a handful of model organisms. Important studies in organisms that can help us better understand the evolutionary relationships on a large scale tend to be hidden far away from the limelight of press releases and big journals. Here’s one example (March 30, 2006):