Cognition

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Category archives for Cognition

Cognitive Monthly

I am pretty much on record that I would not pay for anything online (to be precise, to pay for content – I certainly use the Web for shopping). But with some caveats. I have been known to hit a PayPal button of people who provide content and information I find valuable. And I would…

Animal Cognition

Thanks to John Wilkins, I want to point you to an excellent review on the current state of research (both scientific and philosophical) in Animal Cognition.

I had no time to read this in detail and write a really decent overview here, perhaps I will do it later, but for now, here are the links and key excerpts from a pair of exciting new papers in PLoS Biology and PLoS ONE, which describe the patterns of expression of a second type…

How to talk about Health Care

Rockridge Institute published a set of articles (and a video ad) that I found quite interesting about the way to frame health care. See for yourself: Introduction to Rockridge’s Health Care Campaign: Framing for Rockridge is about the honest expression of the progressive moral view based upon empathy and responsibility for oneself and others. It…

Unfortunately, due to the Murphy’s Law of conference dates, I will have to miss this fantastic meeting, because I will at the time be at another fantastic meeting, but if you can come, please do – registration will be open online in a few days. Autonomy, Singularity, Creativity The conference theme is about bringing scientists…

In the May 18th issue of Science there is a revew paper by Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg. An expanded version of it also appeared recently in Edge and many science bloggers are discussing it these days. Enrique has the best one-sentence summary of the article: The main source of resistance to scientific ideas…

Curse Words

Last week’s Casual Friday study on Cognitive Daily tried to look at the way various curse words are used and perceived by their blog readers. Today, the results are in and, though not surprising, they are quite interesting. The sample is probably skewed towards well-educated folks interested in cognitive science, as well as towards the…

Sex And Prenatal Hormone Exposure Affect Cognitive Performance: Yerkes researchers are using their findings to better understand sex differences in cognitive performance, which may lead to increased understanding of the difference in neuropsychological disorders men and women experience. In one of the first research studies to assess sex differences in cognitive performance in nonhuman primates,…

Framing and Truth

Truth, All the Truth, and Nothing but the Truth. You are all familiar with the phrase. It actually figures prominently (though unspoken until now) in this whole discussion about framing science. Nobody – absolutely nobody – ever suggests that anything but The Truth should be used when communicating science or communicating about science. The wisdom…

Mind of a Raven

When my ‘Scientific American’ arrived the other day, I was excited to read the article about ravens by Bernd Heinrich, as I loved his book Mind of a Raven. I was also glad to see that new cool experiments have been done since the book came out. But I wondering how to blog about an…