Earth

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Category archives for Earth

Boom ‘n’ Doom: Volcanoes, North Carolina and North Carolina Volcanoes November 18th; Acro CafĂ© on the fourth floor of the Museum of Natural Sciences 8:30-10:00 am with discussion beginning at 9:00 followed by Q&A Volcanic activity half a world away can affect us in our own state. When Indonesia’s Mount Tambora erupted over about 4…

From Sigma Xi: Greetings everyone. Here’s hoping that summer treated you kindly and that you are ready to dive back into American Scientist magazine’s annual Pizza Lunch speaker series. We begin this year at noon, Thursday, Sept. 24 at Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society here in Research Triangle Park. Come hear UNC-Chapel Hill chemist…

Happy birthday, Milutin Milankovic

Today is the 130th anniversary of the birth of Milutin Milankovic, a Serbian geophysicist best known for Milankovitch cycles that describe periodicities in Earth’s climate. Vedran Vucic is in Dalj (near Vukovar, Croatia), Milankovic’s birthplace, today for the birthday celebrations. He says that the house in which Milankovic grew up has been renovated for the…

July 24, 2008 presentation by Stephen Schneider for the Stanford University Office of Science Outreach’s Summer Science Lecture Series. Professor Schneider discusses the local, regional, and international actions that are already beginning to address global warming and describe other actions that could be taken, if there were political will to substantially reduce the magnitude of…

From SCONC: Tuesday, March 17 7 p.m. “Hope, Hype and Communicating Climate Change” The Asheville SCONCs welcome nationally prominent science writer Rick Borchelt to speak on making climate change information intelligible to the lay public. This is the first in a series of three public education lectures on climate change to be held in April…

Wet or Dry, it’s our Earth

Carnival of the Arid #2, the blog carnival about deserts, is up on Coyote Crossing. Related to lack of water is, well, lack of water and how it affects people, leads to wars over water, etc. So for the World Water Day on March 22, the blogosphere will write about transboundary water. Send your entries…

Those of you who have been following the science blogosphere for a while may remember that excellent old blog Down to Earth which, sadly, went dormant back in 2006. I am happy to announce that Daniel Collins has now started a new blog, focused on water, hydrology and other All Things Wet, at Cr!key Creek…

A very brief history of plagiarism

Archy does an amazing detective job on who stole what from whom in the old literature on mammoths, going back all the way to Lyell! Then, as much of that literature is very old, he provides us with a history and timeline of the ideas of copyright and plagiarism so we could have a better…

Did you know that the largest desert on Earth is Antarctica? And the second largest is Arctic? And only then comes Sahara! Well, I knew that because Hal Heathwole taught a Desert Ecology course that many of my buddies in grad school took. But if you don’t believe me, check out the Wikipedia page about…

Ships and Spaceships

Yes, this has been in the works for a long time, and a few hints have been planted here and there over the past months, but now it is official – NASA and The Beagle Project have signed a Space Act Agreement and will work together on a host of projects including scientific research and…