Framing Science

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Category archives for Framing Science

Framing San Francisco

Just came back home from a very pleasant dinner with Matt Nisbet. What luck that our trips to San Francisco coincided so well! Oh, and of course, Profesor Steve Steve was there as well…

Mindy discovered a cool series of videos on YouTube, done by a physics teacher. The first one is called The Most Terrifying Video You’ll Ever See: Then, to respond to questions and comments, he added Patching Holes #1, Patching Holes #2 and Patching Holes #3, also well worth watching. This is certainly no Al Gore!

More on Framing Science

These three links have recently become freely available: Chris Mooney’s interview with Treehugger. Chris Mooney’s article in Harper’s Magazine/ And a report from the NYAS meeting.

Science Cartoon Contest

The Union of Concerned Scientists has picked the 12 finalists in their cartoon contest and it is now your turn to vote for the best one. While I personally prefer the TomTomorrowesque #9, I think that the simpler cartoons, e.g., #2 and #10, may ‘frame’ the issue the best (i.e., making it simple and not…

Talking To The Public

So, Anton Zuiker and I went yesterday to the Talking To The Public panel discussion at Duke, organized by Sigma Xi, The Council for the Advancement of Science Writing and The Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy. There is nothing yet on their websites about it (the 20th century school of thought!), but the…

Voters’ Brains and Framing Politics

First, a video of Jonathan Haidt – Morality: 2012 (Hat-tip to Kevin): The social and cultural psychologist Jonathan Haidt talks with Henry Finder about the five foundations of morality, and why liberals often fail to get their message across. From “2012: Stories from the Near Future,” the 2007 New Yorker Conference. Second, a post by…

So, which cover do you like better?

This one? Or this one? Framing Science is not just verbal. Visual aspects are also important.

The Headline of the Week

“Fine in practice, but how does it work in theory?” This headline (in a French paper, of course), prompted Sally Green to pen a fine, fine post – an Obligatory Reading of the Day – about class, education, the psychology of class, the difference between academia and the real world, the difference between theory and…

In the May 18th issue of Science there is a revew paper by Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg. An expanded version of it also appeared recently in Edge and many science bloggers are discussing it these days. Enrique has the best one-sentence summary of the article: The main source of resistance to scientific ideas…

You may be aware that there is a huge discussion about framing science going on in the blogosphere. It has gotten out of hand. But, for those who want to dig in, or want to analyze the posts and comments (that is a lot of data!), here is the comprehensive list of links (excluded are…