History of Science

A Blog Around The Clock

Category archives for History of Science

Now this is bloggy scholarship!

Zombies of the mammoth steppes. Read it now. Can you find something as riveting, yet scholarly and trustworthy, in your newspaper today?

Re: Design

From NESCent: > “Re: Design” – This is a dramatization of the scientific correspondence between Charles Darwin and botanist Asa Gray, and is a product of the Darwin Correspondence Project. NESCent is co-sponsoring this theatrical production with the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, WUNC-TV and the NCSU Theater Dept. The production will be staged at…

Galileo’s telescope is 400 years old

And Google celebrates:

DARWIN LECTURE SERIES CONTINUES! How did we come to be here? Answers to this question have preoccupied humans for millennia. Scientists have sought clues in the genes of living things, in the physical environments of Earth – from mountaintops to the depths of the ocean, in the chemistry of this world and those nearby, in…

Scientific facts are fun. But probably to a limited number of people. It’s more fun to know how scientists got those facts – their thoughts, motivations and methods. How they did it. Why they did it. Where did they get the idea to do it in the first place. It’s even more fun, for a…

Victor Bruce, a lecturer emeritus in biology at Princeton who conducted advanced studies for more than 25 years on the built-in cycles governing natural rhythms like the sleep-wake cycle, has died. He was 88. Bruce, who despite a background in engineering became drawn to biological studies, died Friday, May 29, at his home in Princeton…

Happy birthday, Milutin Milankovic

Today is the 130th anniversary of the birth of Milutin Milankovic, a Serbian geophysicist best known for Milankovitch cycles that describe periodicities in Earth’s climate. Vedran Vucic is in Dalj (near Vukovar, Croatia), Milankovic’s birthplace, today for the birthday celebrations. He says that the house in which Milankovic grew up has been renovated for the…

You may have heard about a recent Wikipedia hoax: A WIKIPEDIA hoax by a 22-year-old Dublin student resulted in a fake quote being published in newspaper obituaries around the world. The quote was attributed to French composer Maurice Jarre who died at the end of March. It was posted on the online encyclopedia shortly after…

Italian scientist, turning 100, still works: Rita Levi Montalcini, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, said Saturday that even though she is about to turn 100, her mind is sharper than it was she when she was 20. Levi Montalcini, who also serves as a senator for life in Italy, celebrates her 100th birthday on Wednesday, and…

Carl has posted it: My review of that day…