History of Science

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Category archives for History of Science

Why Study Science? (1955)

Thanks to reader Paul for this tip – what an amazing piece of history: an instructional movie from the Sputnik Era, explaining why one should study science. Many of the arguments have not changed since then, though the details of sciences and technologies used in the film are very different. The role of women is,…

From SCONC: Tuesday, March 31 6:30 p.m. “Life after Darwin: Are there still big discoveries to be made in biology?” NC State ecologist Rob Dunn continues the NC Museum of Natural Science’s Charles Darwin Lecture Series. Free lecture; doors open at 6. Museum of Natural Science, downtown Raleigh. Please RSVP to museum.reservations@ncmail.net. (Next in the…

Mammoths in History

Archy continues to post snippets of his research on the history of the discoveries and descriptions of mammoths: The description of the mammoth as a subterranean animal that dies on exposure to surface air is almost identical to that given by the Chinese writer Tung-fang So in the second century BC….

Big Beagle Project news

It appears that the Beagle Project crew will have a trial run on the Brazilian ship Tocorime – not a replacement for building the Beagle, but getting the feet wet, seeing what is involved, learning from the experience, before the Real Deal. Funded by the British Council, they will circumnavigate around South America following that…

A very brief history of plagiarism

Archy does an amazing detective job on who stole what from whom in the old literature on mammoths, going back all the way to Lyell! Then, as much of that literature is very old, he provides us with a history and timeline of the ideas of copyright and plagiarism so we could have a better…

The very first, inaugural, and absolutely amazing edition of the Diversity in Science Carnival is now up on Urban Science Adventures. Wow! Just wow! Totally amazing stuff. And what a reminder of my White privilege – a couple of names there are familiar to me, as I have read their papers before, never ever stopping…

Carl Zimmer on Darwin (video)

Darwin Day recap

On Thursday, for Darwin’s 200th birthday, I went down to Raleigh to the Museum of Natural Science to hear Carl Zimmer’s talk. The room was packed – I got the last empty seat and there were people standing in the back. A very mixed audience, as Museum talks usually are – there were evolutionary biologists…

History of Mammoth discoveries in Asia

John McKay has been blogging his research on the early days of mammoth discoveries in Asia and it is an amazing read! Who ever said that academic writing has to be dull!? Fragments of my research – I: Studying early knowledge of mammoths presents two problems. The first, is that the people who found mammoth…

Darwin Day in the Blogosphere

Lots of excitement this week on science blogs and other fans of reality. The biggest biggy of the biggest biggies is Blog For Darwin blog swarm – submit your entries here. But there are some other, smaller initiatives out there. For instance, this Darwin Meme. And Darwinfest haiku contest. And if you are blogging more…