Insects

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Category archives for Insects

What bug is this?

A reader sent me this picture, asking for an ID – it was taken in upstate New York:

At the NC Museum of Natural Sciences: What’s Bugging You? Animals We Love to Hate Wednesday, September 30, 2009 8:00 – 10:00 am with discussion beginning at 9:00 followed by Q&A Location: The Acro Cafe – 4th Floor of the Museum of Natural Sciences Fire ants. Mosquitoes. Flies. Ticks. Gnats. Bed Bugs. The list goes…

The World is a radio show co-produced by WGBH Boston, Public Radio International and BBC. You can probably hear it on your local NPR station – if not, you can find all the shows recorded on the website. You may remember that I went to Boston a few months ago, as a part of a…

A couple of German bloggers and I went to see the Butterfly House on the Island of Mainau. They had good cameras with lenses that allowed them to take extreme close-ups. I had to do with a little pocket camera, but a few pictures turned out decent enough to show:

Name this Bug!

I am pretty sure it’s a true bug (i.e., I am not being sloppy by calling just any ole’ insect a bug). I got as close as I could with my iPhone, but the lighting was bad. This is on my porch and the bug is really large – about 1 inch in length of…

Most people are aware that social insects, like honeybees, have three “sexes”: queens, drones and workers. Drones are males. Their only job is to fly out and mate with the queen after which they drop dead. Female larvae fed ‘royal jelly’ emerge as queens. After mating, the young queen takes a bunch of workers with…

Meetings I’d like to go to….Part V

Genetic Manipulation of Pest Species: Ecological and Social Challenges: In the past 10 years major advances have been made in our ability to build transgenic pest strains that are conditionally sterile, harbor selfish genetic elements, and express anti-pathogen genes. Strategies are being developed that involve release into the environment of transgenic pest strains with such…

Making an Emerging Cage (video)

A well-written press release on a very well done and exciting study: Honey bees on cocaine dance more, changing ideas about the insect brain: In a study published in 2007, Robinson and his colleagues reported that treatment with octopamine caused foraging honey bees to dance more often. This indicated that octopamine played a role in…