Neuroscience

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Category archives for Neuroscience

Long-time readers of this blog remember that, some years ago, I did a nifty little study on the Influence of Light Cycle on Dominance Status and Aggression in Crayfish. The department has moved to a new building, the crayfish lab is gone, I am out of science, so chances of following up on that study…

A well-written press release on a very well done and exciting study: Honey bees on cocaine dance more, changing ideas about the insect brain: In a study published in 2007, Robinson and his colleagues reported that treatment with octopamine caused foraging honey bees to dance more often. This indicated that octopamine played a role in…

Happy Anniversary, PLoS ONE! Today is PLoS ONE’s second anniversary and we’re celebrating by announcing that the winner of the second PLoS synchroblogging competition is SciCurious of the Neurotopia 2.0 blog. “This fluent post captures the essence of the research and accurately communicates it in a style that resonates with both the scientific and lay…

As you know, H.M. died last week. Listen to this brief (9 minutes) NPR Science Friday podcast – you will be able to hear Henry Gustav Molaison’s voice. But most importantly, he has donated his brain to further scientific study. His brain will be sliced and stained and studied at The Brain Observatory at the…

Everyone who’s ever taken a Neuroscience class in college remembers the strange case of H.M. H.M. suffered from epilepsy. Back in 1953, his brain was operated on – some large chunks (the hippocampi) were removed. Epilepsy was gone. So was his memory. He could remember his life before surgery, but could not form any new…

You know I have a soft spot for crayfish, so I was excited to read about the new study about their nervous system, nicely explained by Mo: When confronted with threatening stimuli and predators, the crayfish responds with an innate escape machanism called the startle reflex. Also known as tailflipping, this stereotyped behaviour involves rapid…

Internet use ‘good for the brain’

Or so says this BBC article: A University of California Los Angeles team found searching the web stimulates centres in the brain that control decision-making and complex reasoning. The researchers say this might even help to counter-act the age-related physiological changes that cause the brain to slow down.

The Human & The Humanities

From The National Humanities Center: The National Humanities Center will host the third and final conference on “The Human & The Humanities,” November 13 – 15, 2008, once again attracting scientists and humanities scholars to discuss how developments in science are challenging traditional notions of “the human.” Events will begin on the evening of November…

…but if you do, I hope it was enjoyable! And edifying, of course. Kind of science that is amenable to experimentation at home.

Voluntary trepanation patient

Mo has the scoop – a fascinating interview with Heather Perry, one of the rare people who voluntarily underwent trepanation surgery.