Open Science

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Category archives for Open Science

It’s barely been a day since PLoS ONE published the article Discovery of the Largest Orbweaving Spider Species: The Evolution of Gigantism in Nephila when a video appeared on YouTube mashing up images and text from the press release: Of course, as this is Open Access, nobody needs to worry about copyright and stuff….though a…

Open Access Week in Serbia

Open Access Week is in full swing and there is a lot of blogging about its various events in many countries. OA week was marked in Serbia this year as well. As you may remember, I went to Belgrade twice in the past two years – in 2008 and 2009 and gave a total of…

Open Access Week

This week – 19th-23rd October 2009 – is the Open Access week around the world – fitting nicely with the 5th birthday of PLoS Medicine. And when I say ‘around the world’ I really mean it. Just check out all the global events happening this week. The OA Week is co-organized by Open Access Directory,…

Open Access 101 (video)

Open Access 101, from SPARC from Karen Rustad on Vimeo.

Press release (in Swedish – translation from the Swedish by Ingegerd Rabow): The Swedish Research Council requires free access to research results. In order to receive research grants the Research council requires now that researchers publish their material freely accessible to all. The general public and other researchers shall have free access to all material…

….to be found on the everyONE blog.

If you are a regular reader of this blog, you are certainly aware that PLoS has started making article-level metrics available for all articles. Today, we added one of the most important sets of such metrics – the number of times the article was downloaded. Each article now has a new tab on the top,…

….is now posted on everyONE blog.

On Speaking of Medicine: PLoS Medicine turns 5 years old on October 19th, 2009. To highlight the crucial importance of open access in medical publishing we’re holding a competition to find the best medical paper published under an open-access license anywhere (not just in PLoS) since our launch. Vote for your choice from the 6…

Now THIS is Open Science!!!

Dinosaur fossils have been dug out for a couple of centuries now. They have been cleaned up and mounted in museums and described in papers and monographs. The way this is all done has evolved over time – the early techniques were pretty crude compared to what palaeontologists do today. One of the important techniques…