Paleontology

A Blog Around The Clock

Category archives for Paleontology

Creative reuse of OA materials

Last week also demonstrated another benefit of Open Access. Not just that everyone could re-use the images from the Ida paper without wondering “is this too much for Fair Use principles?” (yes, I have seen people re-post every single image from the paper into their articles/posts, plus lengthy excerpts of text), but people could do…

Night, night, Ida…

Some 47 million years ago, Ida suffocated in the volcanic ashes. I feel the same way at the end of this week – I need to get some air. And some sleep. But watching the media and blog coverage of the fossil around the clock for a few days was actually quite interesting, almost exhilarating…

Wow! Check Google.com

…and you’ll see this:

Another super-cool day at PLoS (one of those days when I wish I was not telecommuting, but sharing in the excitement with the colleagues at the Mothership) – the publication of a very exciting article describing a rarely well-preserved fossil of a prehistoric primate in a lineage to which we all belong as well: Complete…

Last Extinction on PBS

Check out the show’s web page: Fifteen thousand years ago North America was like the Serengeti on steroids, with mega-creatures roaming a continent teeming with incredible wildlife. But then, in a blip of geologic time, somewhere between 15 and 35 magnificent large types of animals went extinct. In a television exclusive, NOVA joins forces with…

A very brief history of plagiarism

Archy does an amazing detective job on who stole what from whom in the old literature on mammoths, going back all the way to Lyell! Then, as much of that literature is very old, he provides us with a history and timeline of the ideas of copyright and plagiarism so we could have a better…

Fossils! Fossils! Fossils!

You may be aware that PLoS ONE has started making Collections of papers in various areas of research. The older PLoS journals have been making collections for a long time. PLoS ONE is just starting. Last month we put together the first such collection – Stress-Induced Depression and Comorbidities: From Bench to Bedside. Today, we…

History of Mammoth discoveries in Asia

John McKay has been blogging his research on the early days of mammoth discoveries in Asia and it is an amazing read! Who ever said that academic writing has to be dull!? Fragments of my research – I: Studying early knowledge of mammoths presents two problems. The first, is that the people who found mammoth…

An Awesome Whale Tale

When I was a little kid, almost nothing was known about evolution of whales. They were huge, they were marine and they were mammals, but their evolutionary ancestry was open to speculation. Some (like Darwin himself) hypothesized that the terrestrial ancestor of whales looked like a bear. Others favored the idea of a hippo-like or…