Physiology

A Blog Around The Clock

Category archives for Physiology

From SCONC: Even if you haven’t heard of Bisphenol A (BPA), you’ve likely been exposed to it. The endocrine disrupting compound is common in plastic infant bottles, water bottles, food cans and lots of other products. Scientists debate its dangers but the National Toxicology Program (based in RTP) acknowledges BPA as a source of “some…

Long-time readers of this blog remember that, some years ago, I did a nifty little study on the Influence of Light Cycle on Dominance Status and Aggression in Crayfish. The department has moved to a new building, the crayfish lab is gone, I am out of science, so chances of following up on that study…

Zoo animals need to slim down

So, the zoo nutritionists got together for a 2-day meeting at NCSU to discuss the issue: Obesity among zoo animals is such a complex problem that zoo nutritionists, scientists and others, from as far away as England, gathered at N.C. State University on Friday for a two-day symposium on such weighty matters as how to…

It’s Thanksgiving tomorrow and the question (of the title of this post) pops up on the internets again. See SciCurious and Janet for the latest local offerings. Short answer: we don’t know. But there is endless speculation about it, each taking into account bits and pieces of information that we know about tryptophan and related…

An Evolutionary Look at Sperm Holds Secrets of Mobility, Fertility: The fusion of sperm and egg succeeds in mammals because the sperm cells hyperactivate as they swim into the increasingly alkaline female reproductive tract. One fast-moving sperm drives on through the egg’s fertilization barrier. Mammals have sperm with a tail that reacts when calcium ions…

Apparently yes: Freshwater Farm Ponds Turning into Crab Farms: North Carolina’s native blue crab population has been at historic lows since 2000. Dr. Dave Eggleston, director of NC State’s Center for Marine Sciences and Technology (CMAST) and professor of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences, looked at various methods for helping the population recover. He hit…

‘Normal’ body temperature? Not really.

Once a year, I go back to my alma mater and do a guest lecture about biological clocks in an Anatomy & Physiology class. Knowing how many pre-meds are among the 200 students in the room, I try to start with some examples of rhythms in human physiology (and disease), and the first one is…

Bats, Bats, Bats!

This month’s Theme Of The Month in PLoS ONE are bats! Midway between the release of Batman II and Halloween, this sounds like an appropriate choice. Peter Binfield provides more information. A number of our bat papers have received media and blog coverage (and not just by Anne-Marie!), but it is never too late. Bloggers…

…but if you do, I hope it was enjoyable! And edifying, of course. Kind of science that is amenable to experimentation at home.

Good science on the blogs these days!

Broca’s Area, 1865: This doesn’t sound too out there to us now, but at the time it caused a lot of controversy. The problems wasn’t the localization to the inferior frontal lobe, it was Broca’s claim that it was the LEFT inferior frontal lobe. This didn’t sit well with a lot of scientists at the…