Science Practice

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In today’s PLoS Computational Biology: Adventures in Semantic Publishing: Exemplar Semantic Enhancements of a Research Article: Scientific innovation depends on finding, integrating, and re-using the products of previous research. Here we explore how recent developments in Web technology, particularly those related to the publication of data and metadata, might assist that process by providing semantic…

About a week ago, my brother sent me a couple of interesting papers about funding in science, one in Canada, the other in the UK. I barely had time to skim the abstracts at the time, but thought I would put it up for discussion online and come back to it later. So I posted…

This is very interesting, referring to Canadian system: Cost of the NSERC Science Grant Peer Review System Exceeds the Cost of Giving Every Qualified Researcher a Baseline Grant: Using Natural Science and Engineering Research Council Canada (NSERC) statistics, we show that the $40,000 (Canadian) cost of preparation for a grant application and rejection by peer…

Are solo authors less cited?

Daniel Lemire asks this question when observing a fallacy voiced in an editorial: …..only a small fraction of the top 100 papers ranked by the number of citations (17 of 100) were published by single authors…..a published paper resulting from collaborative work has a higher chance of attracting more citations. You can discuss the fallacy…

Diffusion of Knowledge

Science Depends on the Diffusion of Knowledge: According to the National Science Foundation, there are over 2.5 million research workers worldwide, with more than 1.2 million in the U.S. alone.1 If we look at all the articles, reports, emails and conversations that pass between them, we could count billions of knowledge transactions every year. This…

Dorothea found an intriguing survey – If it’s not online… – in which physicists and astronomers say, pretty much, that ‘if an article is not online then it is not worth the effort to obtain it’. An interesting discussion (with a couple of more links added by others) ensued here. What do you assume if…

Why are scientists so HARD to move!?

The unmovable movers! Or so says Bill Hooker: For instance: I use Open Office in preference to Word because I’m willing to put up with a short learning curve and a few inconveniences, having (as they say here in the US) drunk the Open Kool-Aid. But I’m something of an exception. Faced with a single…

The Two Cultures in the 21st Century: A full-day symposium sponsored by: Science & the City, ScienceDebate2008, Science Communication Consortium At the 50th anniversary of C.P. Snow’s famous Rede Lecture on the importance to society of building a bridge between the sciences and humanities, this day-long symposium brings together leading scholars, scientists, politicians, authors, and…

World’s Biggest Scientific Fraud?

Wow! This is massive! From Anesthesiology News: Scott S. Reuben, MD, of Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass., a pioneer in the area of multimodal analgesia, is said to have fabricated his results in at least 21, and perhaps many more, articles dating back to 1996. The confirmed articles were published in Anesthesiology, Anesthesia and…

Bill decided to take a look: Fooling around with numbers: Interesting, no? If the primary measure of a journal’s value is its impact — pretty layouts and a good Employment section and so on being presumably secondary — and if the Impact Factor is a measure of impact, and if publishers are making a good…