Cognitive Daily

Archives for April, 2006

When we are wronged, we expect the wrongdoer to apologize. But some apologies just don’t seem to cut the muster. As a teacher, my least favorite excuse was always this one: “Can I have an extension on the assignment? I’ve got a really important assignment due in _______ class.” If the other class is so…

Last week’s study generated plenty of interest: it was the fastest we’ve ever gotten 400 responses. The study was based on a claim by this web site that they could influence your thoughts with 98 percent accuracy using a simple math quiz. If you haven’t tried it yet, unfortunately I’m going to spoil it for…

The transfer of archives from the old Cognitive Daily site is now complete; all of our archives are now available here at ScienceBlogs! There really are some amazing articles back there. Here are some of my favorites from CogDaily’s adolescent months: Can our understanding of “Normal” and “Beautiful” be distorted? A boy and his dog…

More greatest hits

I’ve now finished posting archives up through June of 2005. There’s some great stuff in there — here are some highlights: Drumbeats alone can convey emotion Is memory better for shocking events? Why we can’t all be divas What makes a wine expert? Kids’ unreliability as witnesses: Hard wired into the brain? Why some of…

When two athletes are the same size and strength, what makes one better than the other? In many sports, the best athletes are the ones who can react more quickly to game situations than others. Are they just generally better at focusing their attention where it needs to be? Or have they learned some skill…

Archives coming live

Over the next few days I’ll be dusting off the old Cognitive Daily posts and moving them over to this site. If you’ll scroll down a bit to the archives section on the sidebar to the left, you’ll notice that they now extend all the way back to our first post back in January of…

A number of studies have found cultural differences in visual cognition. For example, Takahiko Masuda and Richard Nisbett found that when Americans watch a short video clip of an underwater scene, they tend to recall the items in the foreground: the fish. Japanese people watching the same clip recall the items in the background: rocks,…

Cognitive Daily reader “Jokermage” pointed us to a web site which claimed that it could predict with 98 percent accuracy what site visitors would be thinking after a short quiz. I tried the quiz, and indeed, the site appeared to “predict” my thoughts. But could it really do this with 98 percent accuracy? We’ve decided…

Last week, we asked our readers a few questions about procrastination: how long it takes them to wake up on a typical morning, how close to the deadline they finish computing their taxes, and so on. The basic question was, are there different types of procrastinators, or if you put off one type of activity,…

If you’re older than about 20, you’ll probably recognize the image to the left from an anti-drug campaign from the 1980s. The image was supposed to represent the effects of drugs on the human brain. While the effectiveness of the campaign is debatable, the fact that it now seems a quaint relic of a bygone…