Cognitive Daily

Archives for May, 2006

Recent research suggests that one of the reasons that as many as 97 percent of women and 68 percent of men experience food cravings is because of visual representations of food. When we picture food in our minds, our desire for the food increases. So why not just distract the visual system? One research team…

The Stroop Effect is one of the most-studied phenomena in psychology. The test is easy to administer, and works in a variety of contexts. The simplest way to see how it works is just to look the following two lists. Don’t read them, instead say the color each word is displayed in, as quickly as…

All the ScienceBloggers have been asked to write about the recent invention they could wipe off the face of the earth. Their answers have been the usual suspects: nuclear bombs, land mines — truly awful stuff — and they might be right. However, I’m not enough of a historian to know what the full impact…

Every year it seems there are more and more graduation ceremonies to attend. Not just high school and college, but middle school, and even elementary and pre-school ceremonies. All this has made us wonder. Which of these ceremonies is really worth attending? Now we all have a chance to find out, because that’s what we’ll…

Last week, we asked Cognitive Daily readers to tell us what they believed was an acceptable excuse for two very different social gaffes. Here’s the first scenario: Suppose a co-worker insulted you during a meeting which involved your boss and several colleagues. The insult was audible to all, and caused you grave embarrassment. And here’s…

Applying science to art

Over at Uncertain Principles, Chad Orzel’s hosting a discussion on who should be on a hypothetical Mount Rushmore of science. There’s a fairly broad consensus that Darwin, Einstein, and Newton make the cut, but rather heated debate on who should be the fourth member. Many of Chad’s readers suggest Sigmund Freud. I found that surprising,…

Americans, as any ScienceBlogger will tell you, have a woefully poor understanding of math and science. For the most part, even the most ignorant among us are able to stumble through life, but what happens when we’re confronted with a genuine scientific question with a real impact on our lives? Consider the typical doctor’s office…

Family lore has it that my uncle was influential in instituting what is now a fixture in college education: student evaluation of college instructors. He was class president at the University of Washington in the 1960s, when tensions between students and the school administrators were high, and he suggested implementing one of the first student…