Cognitive Daily

Archives for June, 2006

The next Encephalon neuroscience carnival will be published on Monday, July 3, at The Neurophilosopher. If you have a blog post or article to contribute, send your submissions to encephalon.host@gmail.com.

One third of the way there!

In just one day, we’ve funded nearly one third of the amount required for “The Shocking Simplicity of Electric Circuits” project. We can give these kids the passion for science with just a few more donations — and today is the last day of our challenge. So if you just haven’t gotten around to donating,…

One of the amazing things about the Stroop Effect is how much good research is being done based on this simple phenomenon, over 70 years later. One of the neatest recent experiments was created by Peter Wühr and Florian Waszak. I think I’ve created a simple animation that replicates their results. Click on the image…

A team of researchers in Japan has built a device that is capable of reproducing an impressively large array of smells, says a report in New Scientist. The system will use 15 chemical-sensing microchips, or electronic noses, to pick up a broad range of aromas. These are then used to create a digital recipe from…

There’s been a decent amount of press lately about the struggles of boys in education. More women than men go to college, and more graduate. But Jay Matthews of the Washington Post is skeptical. He cites an Education Sector report (full PDF here) which claims that much of the hype about boys suddenly falling behind…

We’ve got just three days left for our Donors Choose Challenge. Based on the poll we conducted last week, the primary reason (short of being broke) for not donating is not seeing a worthwhile project. I’ve now added one more that I think is particularly worthy: The Shocking Simplicity of Electric Circuits. This project would…

When I play video games with my son Jim, I’m generally at a tremendous disadvantage. Most of the time, Jim has had more experience with the particular game we’re playing, but even when we try a brand-new game, he just seems to get his bearings more quickly than I do. He doesn’t have more experience…

A new blog; a defense of fMRI

Small Gray Matters is a new blog which claims to be “about brains and minds. What else do you need to know?” For starters, I’d like to know who’s writing it, but I’m prepared to be swayed by good content. The blog’s first post doesn’t disappoint in that regard: it’s a spirited defense of neuroimaging.…

SEED on the allure of fMRI

In case you’re reading this on RSS, or have trained yourself to ignore the links immediately to the right, I wanted to point you to Paul Bloom’s excellent article on Seedmagazine.com. Why does an fMRI brain scan suddenly make a humdrum task suddenly seem like “real science?” Bloom points to one experiment (NOT involving an…

Mind-reading machines

The BBC has an article about the latest computer “mind-reading” technology. It’s not as sinister as it sounds: the computer is programmed to monitor human facial expressions and attempt to recognize the corresponding emotion. Peter Robinson, professor of computer technology at the University of Cambridge, said: “The system can already cope with the variation in…