Cognitive Daily

Archives for October, 2006

Casual Fridays: Visual Illusions

Today’s Casual Fridays study involves visual illusions. We’re exploring when and how you see illusions. You’ll need QuickTime and a computer with the volume turned up to participate. These illusions are great fun, and we’re excited to see if there are any differences in how they are perceived. We really can’t tell you much more…

Yahoo! reports on a new study sponsored by Apple to help sell 30-inch monitors: The study, which evaluated Apple’s 30-inch Apple Cinema Display, concluded that large screens can offer gains of up to 50 percent to 65 percent in productivity on a variety of specific office tasks and can earn back their extra costs in…

The Pros and Cons of Backpacking

Since I mentioned here that I took a backpacking trip to the Great Smoky Mountains last weekend, I might also mention that I’m writing a tongue-and-cheek description of the trip, with some pretty good photos, over at Word Munger. The first installment is up now. (Language may be NSFW)

Cognitive Daily would not exist without chocolate. Every week, I buy a bag of chocolate covered raisins, and I portion them out precisely each day so that I’ve finished them by all by (casual) Friday. I try to time my consumption to coincide with the most difficult part of the job: reporting on peer-reviewed journal…

The trouble with science journalism

Janet Stemwedel and Chad Orzel have each written excellent posts on the necessity of improving science journalism. Janet argues that what’s needed is to improve science education: If there were an actual clamor for science reporting that was detailed, informative, and grounded in fact — a clamor not just from scientists but from the people,…

Greetings, prospective students and parents! I’ll be your tour guide today as we explore the mind-opening campus of Encephalon U, one of the most esteemed liberal arts colleges in the nation. As you know, Encephalon U’s admission requirements are extremely strict, so I certainly hope you’ve already taken the SAT Test. Did you realize that…

Last chance for Encephalon entries

I’m headed to the Smoky Mountains tomorrow at noon, so if you’d like to see your blog post included in Monday’s Encephalon neuroscience carnival, you’ll need to submit it by tomorrow at 8:00 a.m. EDT! So, send me your astounding, astonishing, or astute neuroscience posts and I’ll collect them into one convenient post for your…

Today’s analysis of the Blogger SAT Challenge results is the one I’ve been looking forward to the most. After subjecting 109 people to a sample question from the SAT writing test, we’ve learned that bloggers are dumber than high school kids (though there’s some reason to question that analysis). Our participants, most of them bloggers,…

Mosquito gets Ig-Nobel

So psychologists got shut out of the Nobels this year … so what! This year the peace prize at the Ig-Nobels went to a discovery of a psychological phenomenon: how to get rid of teenagers. That’s right, the “teen repellent” is this year’s winner of the Ig-Nobels’ biggest prize. As we have reported on CogDaily,…

As of yesterday, readers had made an astonishing 3,878 individual ratings of the essays in the Blogger SAT Challenge. The average rating was 2.76, compared to 2.9 from the expert judges. Averaging the most popular rating for each essay comes up with an even lower number, 2.51. Anyone who thought that blog readers would judge…