Cognitive Daily

Archives for November, 2006

There’s been an abundance of PowerPoint advice in the science blogosphere lately. Based on my personal experience, I’d say Chad and Amy give some good advice — and it’s advice that probably serves them well in their own presentations. But I was curious about something different. There are plenty of places where you can find…

In 1981, the economist Lester C. Thurow wrote an article for the New York Times entitled “Why women are paid less than men.” If you have a subscription, you can still read it on the Times web site. My copy comes from an anthology I edited in 1992. Thurow’s conclusion: The decade between 25 and…

The APA has an important rule that all authors of APA-sponsored journal articles must agree to before publication: After research results are published, psychologists do not withhold the data on which their conclusions are based from other competent professionals who seek to verify the substantive claims through reanalysis and who intend to use such data…

More on “tone-deafness”

There was some doubt as to whether the “tone-deafness” test I linked to Monday really tests for amusia. The defining trait of amusia is the inability to discern the difference between different musical pitches. So here’s a test that might generate a more clear-cut result. The following track plays five sequences of five notes. In…

Neurosurgeon the hero of new TV show

I’m actually doing better than usual: I’m just a day behind on the latest entertainment news. Last night, CBS premiered a TV show called 3 Lbs., which focuses on the tensions in a world-class neurosurgery unit of a major hospital. Most promising aspect of the show: it stars Stanley Tucci. If you missed it, you…

If a Brahman child from Nepal is asked what she would do if another child spilled a drink on her homework, her response is different from that of a Tamang child from the same country. The Brahman would become angry, but, unlike a child from the U.S., would not tell her friend that she was…

Malcolm Gladwell’s book Blink — and the real research it was based on — made quite a splash when it was unveiled: the idea that a teacher evaluation made in just 30 seconds could actually reliably predict teacher performance over an entire semester was certainly surprising. The Charlotte Observer has an excellent article about how…

Are you tone deaf? Take the test!

There’s an interesting site up which claims to be able to test whether or not you are tone deaf (the technical term for this condition is amusia). Though I’m not a music expert, I took the test, and in my opinion it really was testing my ability to determine the difference between similar musical phrases,…

Casual Fridays: PowerPoint vs. Text

Given all the interest in PowerPoint lately, we thought it might be a good time to devote a Casual Friday to PowerPoint. Specifically, can we learn more from much-maligned PowerPoint, or is good ol’ text better? We’ve designed a study that will present some information in PowerPoint form and some information in text form. Then…

Quick question for those more computer-savvy than I am. Can you help me divide readers into five roughly equal groups (it’s for this week’s Casual Friday). In the past, I’ve relied on the “what month is your birthday in” question, but it won’t work when I need five groups. Surely there’s a simple javascript out…