Cognitive Daily

Archives for January, 2007

Most language processing takes places in the left hemisphere of the brain. When we read, carry on a conversation, or listen to speech, most of the action — for right-handers — takes place on the left side of the brain. (For left-handers, the situation is more complex; it’s not simply a mirror image of a…

Geography quiz answers!

The America versus the World Casual Fridays study was our most popular test yet: The 500 survey slots filled in less than 24 hours. I promised to provide the quiz answers, and you’ll find them below. Some of our readers have asked why we don’t allow everyone to respond, and the reason is simple: we…

Here’s the Cognitive Daily weekly podcast for January 21. Don’t forget that you can subscribe to the podcast using the special RSS feed: http://scienceblogs.com/cognitivedaily/rss-podcasts.xml To subscribe using iTunes, select Subscribe to Podcast from the Advanced menu, then paste or type in the URL. To access the podcast directly, click on the links below: Cognitive Daily’s…

This post on Pharyngula made me realize that most non-Americans really have no occasion to learn the names of U.S. states. As one commenter put it: That map would be much more useful if it labeled the American states as well. The only ones I can pick off with real certainty are California, Texas, Hawaii…

Charles Murray (of The Bell Curve fame) has written a series of articles for the Wall Street Journal on intelligence (available free here). One frustrating aspect of the articles is that Murray doesn’t cite his sources. Consider this statement: Our ability to improve the academic accomplishment of students in the lower half of the distribution…

A group of bloggers has begun an initiative to post on science only for the week beginning February 5. We’re in, but then again, that’s what we do every week! Everything you want to know about the North Carolina Science Blogging Conference this weekend. We’ll be there. Everything you want to know about the Science…

Last week’s post on how sound affects perception of visual events was the most popular post ever on Cognitive Daily, with over 15,000 visits. This was thanks to links from both Fark’s technology page and digg.com. Yet commenters on both sites expressed disappointment with the demo. I wasn’t especially happy with it either, but then…

Over at Developing Intelligence, Chris Chatham has a fascinating discussion of infantile amnesia, which he tantalizingly terms a “myth.” Chris cites research demonstrating that infants can and do remember things, even stories read to them in the womb: 3-day-old infants were capable of distinguishing a particular passage (from Dr. Seuss’s “Cat in the Hat”) that…

In other news

Industry-sponsored articles in medical journals are likely to be ghost-authored. Most often, data analysis is conducted by a person not listed among the study’s authors. New study explores why people believe conspiracy theories. Or so “they” want you to believe. Stanford Prison Experiment on YouTube. I read the study many years ago, and that was…

Here in North Carolina, for many sports fans, it’s considered common knowledge that basketball referees don’t call fouls against Duke. The reasons for the supposed bias vary from racism, to payoffs from wealthy alums, to the intimidating atmosphere at Duke’s legendary Cameron Indoor Stadium, but nearly everyone in the state who’s not a Duke fan…