Cognitive Daily

Archives for November, 2008

Greta walks a mile to work every day. I work at home, so I don’t walk around town much. I’m much more likely to be driving down the street where we live than walking on it. Does this affect our attitude towards pedestrians when we drive? Greta and I have also both noticed that there…

(This entry was originally posted in May, 2006) We’ve discussed implicit attitudes on Cognitive Daily before, but never in the context of food. The standard implicit attitude task asks you to identify items belonging to two different categories. Consider the following lists. Use your mouse to click on items which are either pleasant or related…

Boundary extension is a phenomenon we’ve discussed a lot on Cognitive Daily. It’s typically described as a memory error: We remember scenes as having bigger boundaries than what we originally saw. Take a look at these two pictures of Jim: If you only saw picture A by itself, then later you’d remember seeing a picture…

Last week we wondered how having kids affects our own childhood memories. In many ways, our kids remind us of our own childhood, allowing us to relive our favorite memories. But kids also distract us by being so adorable (or not so adorable), and with new memories that might become more prominent than the old…

CogDaily’s best posts of the year?

Here are the four posts that I selected to nominate for Open Laboratory 2008, the collection of the best science blog posts of the year: Toddlers play with impossibly small toys as if they’re the real thing Will video games solve sex-discrimination in science? How to make your eye feel like it’s closed, when it’s…

A Necker cube is bi-stable figure, meaning that it can be perceived as two different three-dimensional objects, depending on how you look at it: Cube A is ambiguous — the true Necker cube. Cube B and cube C show the two ways you can perceive the Necker cube: either the bottom of the cube is…

Plunging in to social networking

I’ve set up accounts on FriendFeed and Twitter with the username davemunger. I’m going to give these sites a try for the next week or so. Unlike with Facebook where we’ve got a profile but haven’t really done much, I’d actually like to actively participate in these networks. I’d appreciate any tips readers have for…

One of things I was taught over and over again when I was in education school was the importance of getting parents involved in kids’ learning. If you get the parents on your side, my professors insisted, then you’re going to be much more able to get through to the students. I didn’t last long…

This morning I was having a conversation with Nora about her AP European history class, and it got me thinking about my own experience taking the same class about 25 years ago (yes, kids, they did have AP classes back then). Mainly it reminded me that I can’t remember much at all about the class.…

Greta and I will be participating in a panel on blogging tomorrow in Charlotte, NC. If you’re in town, you might want to stop by. More information here.