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Here’s this week’s list of notable posts from Psychology and Neuroscience at ResearchBlogging.org. Is autism really surging? Michelle Dawson wonders whether the recent rise in autism rates can be traced to methodological differences in studies tracking autism rates. We know many men are attracted to younger women, but what does it mean to look younger?…

My picks from ResearchBlogging.org

In case you missed them, here are my picks of psychology/neuroscience posts from ResearchBlogging.org from the past two weeks: The fatter we get, the less we seem to notice. Peter Janiszewski examines changing perceptions of what it means to be “overweight.” Barn owls use feathers to find sounds. A new study confirms that the facial…

This week on SEED, I’m writing about Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), a promising new way to treat clinical depression. Here’s a snippet: In DBS therapy, one or more electrodes the size of a spaghetti strand are precisely positioned in the patient’s brain, then connected by wire around the skull and through the neck to a…

My SEED column this week focuses on artificial sweeteners. Can switching to artificial sweeteners help solve the obesity problem in the U.S.? Here’s a snippet: Saunders says an August report from the American Heart Association (AHA) made it quite clear that excessive sugar consumption is dangerous, and he argues that sugar should be seen as…

Over at SEEDMAGAZINE.COM, my column discusses the recent flurry of blog posts and media reporting on the placebo effect. Here’s a snippet: This is the primary misconception about placebos: that the placebo itself is somehow “working” to treat a medical condition. You can see it even in the headline for an otherwise well-crafted article that…

In case you missed them, here are my picks from ResearchBlogging.org’s Psychology and Neuroscience posts from the past week. Mice navigate a virtual-reality maze. Go for the amazingly cute video. Stay for the science! Brain imaging for lie-detection doesn’t live up to the hype. Remember all those stories about fMRI lie detectors a couple years…

In case you missed them, here are my picks this week for psychology/neuroscience posts from ResearchBlogging.org. Viewers of videos synchronize their blinking. It’s true. When people watch videos in a group, they tend to blink at the same time. Steve Genco explains why. The goal really does seem bigger when you’re kicking well. Mo explains…

My picks from ResearchBlogging.org

In case you missed them, here are my picks of the week from psychology and Neuroscience from ResearchBlogging.org: Ever wondered how brain cells manage to form synapses only with other cells, and not with themselves? Neuroskeptic describes a fascinating study demonstrating how neurons avoid getting tangled up in themselves. Benefits of attending weight-loss camp go…

Here are my picks this week for the best psychology/neuroscience posts on ResearchBlogging.org. Who feels pain after surgery…LONG after surgery? As many as 50 percent of patients report pain long after surgery. Healthskills examines a paper exploring some of the reasons why. Speaking of pain, how do you study whether overweight people feel “less full”…

Rethinking “Addiction”

My column on SEEDMAGAZINE.COM today addresses the definition of “addiction.” Does it make sense to lump all dependence on substances and even all habits under the umbrella of “dependence?” Here’s a selection: We often think of true addicts as street junkies who prostitute themselves or steal from others to support their habits, but in reality…